Connecting state and local government leaders

Green Projects in 8 Cities Receive $30,000 to $75,000 Matching Grants

Pershing Square, Los Angeles.

Pershing Square, Los Angeles.

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

The money comes through a program affiliated with a Florida-based nonprofit.

Projects in eight cities, focused on areas like training people for urban farming jobs, expanding green spaces, and curbing polluted stormwater runoff, received a combined total of roughly $437,000 in grant funding on Monday through a nonprofit group.

The money comes from Partners for Places, an offshoot of the Florida-based Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities. Individual awards ranged from $30,000 to $75,000. Through a matching grant program, Partners for Places connects city governments with organizations that can help fund sustainability projects.

More than $3.5 million in funding has so far been awarded through the Partners for Places grant program.

Cities where the grant funding announced Monday will flow include Atlanta, where $75,000 will help pay for a jobs initiative that employs city residents on an urban farm. The same amount of money will go to Los Angeles to help fund a project meant to convert nine schoolyards into park spaces when school is out. And $30,000 will help pay for a stormwater management pilot project in Burlington, Vermont, meant to improve the water quality in Lake Champlain.

The other five cities where projects will receive funding include: Berkeley, California; Boston, Massachusetts; Bridgeport, Connecticut; Ithaca, New York; and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Among the organizations providing investments in the Partners for Places grant program are Bloomberg Philanthropies, The JPB Foundation, The Kendeda Fund, The New York Community Trust, Summit Foundation, and Surdna Foundation.

A new round of funding will begin through the matching grant program this summer. Applications will become available in June.

Bill Lucia is a Reporter for Government Executive’s Route Fifty.

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