Connecting state and local government leaders

How 7 Mayors Responded to Trump’s Immigration Decision to Keep DACA, Drop DAPA

A protester holds a sign during a demonstration protesting the arrest of Dreamer Daniel Ramirez Medina, who was later released, in front of the federal courthouse in Seattle in February.

A protester holds a sign during a demonstration protesting the arrest of Dreamer Daniel Ramirez Medina, who was later released, in front of the federal courthouse in Seattle in February. Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

The half victory for advocates of federal immigration reform breaks a campaign promise sure to anger the president’s base.

The Trump administration reneged on the president’s campaign promise to deport undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, in the same guidance that scuttled protections for undocumented parents of citizens or permanent residents.

Mayors were quick to voice their displeasure with Thursday’s Department of Homeland Security FAQ on the decision—a half victory for advocates of federal immigration reform:

Phoenix’s mayor earlier praised the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which the guidance states remains unaffected, as “smart public policy” that makes the city stronger with “tens of thousands of DREAMers.”

The Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents was also an Obama initiative but was held up in federal court prior to implementation.

DHS assures Dreamers in the FAQ that their work permits won’t be terminated prior to expiration, and they are still able to apply for three-year work authorizations followed by two-year extensions.

Here’s what other mayors had to say about DACA:

Dave Nyczepir is a News Editor at Government Executive’s Route Fifty and is based in Washington, D.C.

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