Injection Sites Provide Safe Spots to Shoot Up

Supervised drug injection facilities are being proposed in a growing number of cities and states to stem overdose deaths and help people find treatment.

Latest Round of Federal Homeless Assistance Won’t Necessarily Cover Community Losses

In addition to Housing and Urban Development Continuum of Care grants, officials encouraged more state, local and private funding.

Census Uncertainty Spurs State Action to Prevent Undercounting

Starting in February, the bureau will turn over address lists to states and local governments for double-checking that must be finished within 120 days.

The Darker Side to Winning the Amazon HQ2 Sweepstakes

Any rising tech community should adopt a position of cautious enthusiasm in wooing major multinational players.

Why Free College Tuition Is Spreading From Cities to States

The free tuition push hasn’t produced an economic bonanza for any of the pioneering cities—at least not yet — and some states have struggled to come up with the money to keep their end of the bargain.

Low-Lying Boston’s Frigid Flood Risk Reminder

A powerful Nor’easter storm brought some of the highest tides on record to Massachusetts—and they’re a taste of what’s to come.

With ‘Bomb Cyclone,’ Boston Points Residents to This Important Map

Before citizens can help the city keep fire hydrants and catch basins clear of snow, they first need to know where they’re located.

Sacramento's 5G Broadband Bet

Fifth-generation wireless isn’t yet a reality, but Sacramento Chief Information Officer Maria MacGunigal sees the city’s Verizon deal as a something that will hopefully “generate excitement from other carriers to want to invest.”

The Quandary of Designing Streets and Sidewalks to Protect Against Rare Events

Bollards and barriers can help protect pedestrians and crowds from malicious and unintended acts by motorists but can also limit walkability and pose their own hazards and nuisances.

‘Waiting on an Opportunity to Work With the Administration’ on Infrastructure

State and local groups start 2018 awaiting the White House’s long-promised public works package.

As Boston, N.Y. Mayors Start Their 2nd Terms, a Focus on Housing Affordability

In their inauguration speeches, Marty Walsh and Bill de Blasio discuss what may be the the most difficult policy challenge U.S. city halls are facing.

A Bit of Good News in a County That Closed All Its Libraries

As volunteers step up to run community libraries, a new intergovernmental agreement in southwest Oregon gives local advocates there some new hope.

Is the Tax Fight Over the SALT Deduction a Sign of Waning State and Local Influence on Capitol Hill?

“Do we have the clout we once had?" said the executive director of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. "That’s a very difficult question."

A Tech-Enabled Effort to Fight Census Undercounting in San José

There’s a Jan. 15 deadline for localities to update their residential address lists for the U.S. Census Bureau.

Memphis's Novel Strategy for Tearing Down Confederate Statues

In a surprise move Wednesday evening, the city sold two parks to a nonprofit corporation that promptly tore down monuments to Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis.

Virginia Beach Is Using an IoT-Enabled Sensor Network to Predict Flooding in Real Time

Local officials are hoping high-resolution, hydrodynamic models using fluid physics will improve preparedness and response in a low-lying region vulnerable to flooding.

Register for the 2018 Code for America Summit

Mark your calendars and join us in Oakland, California.

Chicago Expected to Pay Another Big Legal Settlement in a Police-Related Lawsuit

In the past two months, the nation’s third-largest city has seen nearly $100 million in judgements from lawsuits involving local law enforcement.

The Criminalization of Gentrifying Neighborhoods

Areas that are changing economically often draw more police—creating conditions for more surveillance and more potential misconduct.