How States Allocate Their Prison Health Care Dollars

Detailed spending data helps track trends and evaluate cost-effectiveness

Felony Conviction Rates Have Risen Sharply, But Unevenly

The share of the population living with a felony conviction has gone up sharply in Georgia and Florida, while West Virginia and New Hampshire still have relatively low rates.

Prison Health Care Spending Varies Dramatically by State

Why such a discrepancy, and what does it indicate?

How One North Carolina County Is Keeping Down Its Jail Population

Mecklenburg County judges are preparing to hold pretrial hearings to determine defendants’ economic statuses before handing down financial punishments.

To Strengthen Public Health, Look to Prisons

High rates of infectious disease in state prisons present a challenge—and an opportunity.

Why Prison Health Care Is Integral to Achieving State Goals

Prison health care intersects with key state goals, including meeting constitutional requirements, protecting public safety and reducing recidivism.

Most States Given Lousy Pretrial Justice Grades

New Jersey received the only A. The national average is a D. Comprehensive reform makes the difference.

8 Counties Advance Plans for Jail Reform

"Many of the jurisdictions want to reduce reliance on money bail and make decisions about who should be held pretrial,” according to the MacArthur Foundation’s director of justice reform.

Breaking the Cycle of Incarceration by Keeping Mothers and Children Together

Hoping to combat the high cost of incarceration and break the cycle of children following their parents to prison, some cities have created programs to keep women out of jail and with their children.

‘Ban the Box’ Laws May Be Harming Young Black Men Seeking Jobs

Several recent studies have found that black men, even those without a criminal history, are less likely to get called back or hired after a ban the box law is put in place.

When Prisoners Are a 'Revenue Opportunity'

As jails install systems that let inmates videochat with "visitors" no matter where they may be, it’s private companies that appear to have the most to gain.

The Watchdog Inside the DA's Office

In Philadelphia and other cities, prosecutors have formed “conviction review units”—special teams that reinvestigate cases they may have gotten wrong.

To Reduce Recidivism, States Scrap Barriers for Ex-Offenders

Hoping to make it easier for people leaving prison to re-enter society—and avoid going back—several states enacted laws aimed at helping ex-offenders get jobs, pay off court debt, and access food stamps.

Voters in Louisiana and Oklahoma Strongly Favor Alternatives to Incarceration

Both states considered, one enacted, sentencing and corrections reforms in 2017

A Replacement for Overworked Public Defenders?

Through a suburban Philadelphia program, offenders’ family members learn how to help their criminal defense—and do some of the nitty-gritty work lawyers would typically handle.

A Mental-Health Crisis in Alabama’s Prisons

In a 302-page opinion, a federal judge in Montgomery condemned the dire conditions faced by prisoners with mental illnesses.

Juvenile Justice Reforms in Kansas Show Early Signs of Success

Passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in 2016, S.B. 367 creates standards to improve juvenile justice system

The Rise of Rural Incarceration

Local jails in smaller counties are seeing enormous growth. A new report explains why.

Seeking Justice: ‘Are We Punishing People for Being Sick?’

Addressing mental health in the criminal justice system, Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey outlines a "blueprint for change."