Contempt for Court

Republican lawmakers are increasingly showing disdain for decisions made by the judicial branch—and by extension the rule of law.

A Bitter Legal Fight Over a Philadelphia Soda Tax Could Decide the Future of Sugar Taxes in the US

Legal battles can be expensive to tax payers and time consuming for city and state legal departments. Philadelphia has been at loggerheads with the industry for almost two years, racking up legal fees north of $1.4 million.

Has the Tide Turned Against Partisan Gerrymandering?

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday struck down the state’s maps as too heavily biased toward Republicans, the latest ruling in a new and contentious battle over legislative districts.

North Carolina's Landmark Ruling Against Partisan Gerrymanders

Judges said redistricting designed to elect Republicans violated the Constitution, the first time a federal court has come to that conclusion.

New York City Has Its Own Fund to Bail People Out of Jail

It’s one of several ways local officials are trying to reform a bail system that the state largely controls.

Public Defenders Fight Back Against Budget Cuts, Growing Caseloads

Public defenders say the funding problem they’ve been shouting about for years is at a crisis point.

Justice Department Releases Immigration ‘Naughty List’ After Latest Court Loss

Attorney General Jeff Sessions now considers jurisdictions that prevent law enforcement from inquiring about immigration status in violation of U.S. Code.

The Problem With Electing Prosecutors

The Manhattan district attorney has come under fire for campaign donations he received—one from Harvey Weinstein's lawyer and others from a Trump family attorney.

Will the Supreme Court Unravel Public Employee Unions?

The conservative justices seem eager to deal a fatal blow to one of the major constituencies of the Democratic Party.

Are Medicaid’s Payment Rates So Low They’re Discriminatory?

A suit in California says the state’s Medicaid program pays doctors so poorly, the mostly Hispanic patients that use the program aren’t getting timely access to quality medical care. Lawyers working on the case believe it is the first to sue Medicaid using a state anti-discrimination statute.

What's the Right Punishment for Tearing Down a Confederate Monument?

In Durham, the sheriff and district attorney appear divided over whether civil disobedience deserves greater leniency from the judicial system.

Commentary: Our Work to Reform the Juvenile Justice System Is Not Yet Complete

A trio of practitioners and experts assert “if our collective responsibility is to foster justice and public safety—as we believe it is—we have miles to go before we sleep.”

The Watchdog Inside the DA's Office

In Philadelphia and other cities, prosecutors have formed “conviction review units”—special teams that reinvestigate cases they may have gotten wrong.

State and Local Attorneys Brace for a Workload Increase

Laws keep evolving, budgets keep tightening and more experienced attorneys are ready to retire, making automation that much more important for governments.

Is Sessions’ Dangling of 'Sanctuary City' Funding an Overstep?

The U.S. attorney general followed through on a threat he made in May, showing he’s willing to withhold millions of dollars meant for criminal justice initiatives if it means getting states and localities to enforce federal immigration law.

Iowa Treasurer Wants Senate ‘Scoundrels’ to Pay $2.2M Sexual Harassment Settlement

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS ROUNDUP: N.J. township nixes Jewish religious boundary; ACLU balks at Maine governor's Facebook use; remembering Talkeetna, Alaska's cat 'mayor'

The Bipartisan Opposition to Sessions's New Civil-Forfeiture Rules

Attorney General Jeff Sessions expanded the controversial police practice on Wednesday by rolling back Obama-era reforms.

‘Bridgegate’ Mastermind Avoids Prison Sentence

Former Chris Christie ally David Wildstein received three years of probation for his involvement in the scandal.

Canines Helping Out in the Courtroom

A growing number of courts across the U.S. are allowing specially trained dogs to accompany child abuse victims and other vulnerable people on the witness stand.