Elder Abuse Is the ‘Silent Epidemic of Our Time’

The opioid abuse crisis may be contributing to a ‘staggering’ spike in adult protective services caseloads. And local officials fear the problem will only get worse.

Good News: Overdose Deaths Fall in 14 States

But the bad news: “But we’re still seeing rates of overdose that are leaps and bounds higher than what we were seeing a decade ago and far beyond any other country in the world.”

Trump’s Historic Medicaid Shift Goes Beyond Work Requirements

All the states requesting Medicaid work requirements are led by Republican governors who tout the “it’s a trampoline, not a hammock” approach to the social services safety net.

The Rush to Replenish Blood Supplies After Mass-Casualty Events

An estimated 38 percent of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood. Less than 10 percent of that population actually do.

Why Police Backing Is Key to Needle Exchanges

Nationwide, the list of syringe exchanges, both official and unofficial, has grown by about 15 percent a year for the past three years, with the fastest growth in Kentucky, North Carolina and Ohio.

Federal Watchdog: State Reporting Gaps Limit Assisted Living Oversight

"This report finds that thousands of seniors face serious health and safety risks in their assisted living facilities,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren said of the Government Accountability Office findings.

15 Kentuckians Sue Trump Administration Over New Medicaid Waiver

The plaintiffs contend that waivers that require work as a prerequisite for health coverage will cause “irreparable harm to the health and welfare of the poorest and most vulnerable in our country.”

Homeless Will Now Be Asked: Are You Fleeing Domestic Violence?

For years, advocates have called victims of domestic violence part of the country’s “hidden homeless.” But now, for the first time, they’re being included in the national homelessness count.

Senate Republicans Blame Medicaid for the Rise in Opioid Deaths

But the data and the on-the-ground experience of local health officials beg to differ.

'Safety Net' Hospitals Face Federal Budget Cuts

The cuts come at a time when many rural hospitals already are struggling to keep their doors open.

Kentucky’s Medicaid Waiver Will Do More Than Just Require People to Work

The state’s waiver would also impose monthly premiums on beneficiaries, and threatens six-month program lockouts on individuals who do not comply with Medicaid rules.

States OK’d to Test Impacts of Work Requirements for Medicaid Beneficiaries

The new guidelines would allow states to force some able-bodied childless adults to work as a condition for eligibility for the federal program.

Likely to Come Soon From the Trump Administration: Guidelines for Medicaid Work Requirements

Experts speculate that Kentucky could be the first state to see its work requirement waiver approved—a move that could mean 95,000 fewer enrollees in that state over the next five years.

America's Rural Hospitals Are Dangerously Fragile

Consolidation in the health-care industry is threatening small and independent hospitals and the communities they're in.

The Fight for Medicaid Expansion Still Isn’t Over in Maine

Plus an update on Medicaid ballot initiatives in Utah and Idaho, and what the legislative tiebreaker in Virginia means for that state’s expansion.

Bad Data Is Partly to Blame in Texas’ Maternal Mortality Spike

Maternal health data in the U.S. is so imprecise the federal government hasn’t released an official annual count of pregnancy-linked fatalities since 2007.

Aging, Undocumented and Uninsured Immigrants Challenge Cities and States

“It’ll place a strain on the entire health care system, from primary care to hospitals,” according to Steven Wallace, associate director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Prison Health Care Spending Varies Dramatically by State

Why such a discrepancy, and what does it indicate?