Breaking Up Is Easy. Reforms Are the Hard Part

Findlay, Ohio broke ties with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after a decade of frustration and flooding. Now their mayor wants the feds to change how they do business.

Dayton Refuses to Fit the Mold of a City Plagued by the Opioid Epidemic

Despite leading the nation in accidental overdose deaths, the city is seeing economic growth and launching innovative educational programs, according to Mayor Nan Whaley.

Governors Want Room to Shape Health Care Innovation

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper are making a second, bipartisan attempt at improving Obamacare and affordability.

Elder Abuse Is the ‘Silent Epidemic of Our Time’

The opioid abuse crisis may be contributing to a ‘staggering’ spike in adult protective services caseloads. And local officials fear the problem will only get worse.

A Difficult Reality for Those Who Want to Run Government 'More Like a Business’

Compared to the private sector, public-sector organizations will always be at a disadvantage when it comes to this management pain point.

Male Mayor Bucks 'Overwhelming Male Power Structure' in City Hall

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Special emergency room designed for opioid overdoses; Mass.’s one-time federal tax reform windfall; hepatitis A scare in Buffalo area; and mayor of Portland, Maine plans to make good on Super Bowl bet.

An End to Gerrymandering in Ohio?

A bipartisan compromise that just passed the state Senate would require minority-party support for political maps, and would limit the number of communities that could be splintered.

Why It’s Hard to Control Drug Prices at the Ballot Box

Voters in California and Ohio have rejected measures meant to limit state spending on prescription drugs. But advocates say they plan to keep trying.

Ohio Seeks to Identify, Help Local Governments Headed for Distress

Detecting trouble early gives states and local governments more flexibility to solve a local government’s fiscal challenges.

New CDC Data Show the Role of Fentanyl and Its Analogs Play in Opioid Death Toll

No state was as harder hit by fentanyl’s animal tranquilizer cousin, carfentanil, than Ohio.

New Special Report: Insights and Ideas for Smart Cities

Dispatches from our coverage of the tools, strategies and systems fueling tech- and data-driven innovation in city governments.

After Long Fight, Some Farmers Get Relief From High Property Taxes

Agricultural property taxes have skyrocketed and crop prices are down. Farmers are fighting back, sometimes successfully.

Ambush Attack at Ohio Courthouse Raises More Security Concerns

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS ROUNDUP | Oklahoma’s teacher shortage worsens; Virginia governor announces big budget surplus; and Miami Beach bolsters security following attacks in Europe.

Multiple States Court Taiwanese Manufacturer, But Is It Worth the Concessions?

Foxconn Technology Group is promising $4 billion in investment and 5,000 new jobs, but not every suitor will get a piece of the pie despite cutting taxes, in some cases, to woo them.

The Route Fifty Roadshow Goes To Columbus

We hope you'll join us as we explore partnerships, technology and smart cities live from the National Association of Counties Annual Conference.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley: I Would Encourage Other Cities to Sue

Her city filed a lawsuit against the pharmaceutical companies, distributors and doctors it believes caused the opioid epidemic. And Whaley thinks other cities should do the same.

Threat of Immigration Enforcement and Worker Shortages Worry Ohio Farmers

Also in our State and Local Daily Digest: A surprising city for the nation’s fastest-growing average rents; Texas governor’s energy regulation resolution; and community health clinics prepare for federal funding cuts.

The Politics of the Opioid Epidemic in Ohio

Also in our State and Local Daily Digest: Iowa department launches review of state’s child-protection system; Pennsylvania Republicans push pension reform; and Lincoln’s trolley troubles.

Are Pharmaceutical Companies to Blame for the Opioid Epidemic?

Recent state, local and tribal lawsuits are asking courts whether the current crisis is comparable to the one over tobacco in the ’90s.