The Mice of N.Y.C. May Be Contributing to Antibiotic Resistance

There's evidence they carry pathogens that make us sick, and some microbial genes capable of making bacteria resistant to certain antibiotics.

Seeking a Quiet Place in a Nation of Noise

No studies have been done on the change in New York City's noise over time, whether it is getting worse or by how much.

A Salmonella Recall Is Affecting 207 Million Eggs Across the U.S.

About 1 million people in the U.S. get sick from salmonella every year, with about 19,000 people hospitalized and 380 deaths.

Some Good News (For Once) About the Nation’s Opioid Abuse Crisis

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Okla. teachers declare victory … Calif. city manager accused of unlawful recordings … N.M. small towns oppose faster internet … and Florida sees uptick in sinkholes.

The States Where People Die Young

A new study explores where and why Americans are dying early.

To Curb Rising Health Insurance Costs, Some States Try 'Reinsurance Pools'

In its first year, Minnesota's reinsurance pool has performed even better than expected.

New Momentum for Addiction Treatment Behind Bars

Nationwide, a quarter of heroin addicts pass through the corrections system each year. But fewer than 1 percent of the more than 5,000 U.S. prisons and jails offer access to FDA-approved medication used in treatment.

A Single Judge Just Gave California Coffee Sellers a Huge Headache

The eight-year court battle stems from a state law that requires businesses in the Golden State to warn consumers of chemicals in their products that have been linked to cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.

Federal Ban on Methadone Vans Seen as Barrier to Treatment

"If we’re going to be effective, we need to be nimble and bring the medication to them instead of asking everybody to trudge across town to get their daily dose at a fixed facility,” according to Brad Finegood, a behavioral health official in King County, Washington.

Dayton Refuses to Fit the Mold of a City Plagued by the Opioid Epidemic

Despite leading the nation in accidental overdose deaths, the city is seeing economic growth and launching innovative educational programs, according to Mayor Nan Whaley.

Trump’s Opioid Crisis Looks Similar, Yet Altogether Different From State and Local Experience

The president’s speech in New Hampshire had a mix of bipartisan solutions, along with highly political ideas and rhetoric that could destroy broad support for his initiative.

Advocates Offer New Remedy for Health Care Woes as a Bridge to Single Payer

“Universal coverage is within our grasp” in California, but the overall cost is yet to be determined.

To Tackle the Opioid Epidemic, Look to the Sewers

At a civic tech pitch led held by mayors at SXSW, innovators put forward solutions to pressing problems facing cities.

Air Pollution Is Bad for Productivity, Even in Office Jobs

For some organizations, investing in air filters might improve the productivity of indoor workers enough to pay for the devices and add to the bottom line.

The Troubled Future for State Medicaid Expansion

The Affordable Care Act’s extension of public insurance to poor adults might finally make its way into every state. But those inroads could come with a cost.

Medicaid Makes Up Largest Share of Grants to States

Mix of total funding from federal grants varied by state

Aid-in-Dying Gains Momentum as Erstwhile Opponents Change Their Minds

New Jersey is one of at least 25 states considering aid-in-dying bills this year. 

States Want More Money and Less Punishment Over Opioids

“To fully address the crisis we have to treat it as a health care issue, as a child welfare issue and as a drain on our local economies,” said U.S. Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state.

The Health-Care Gap Between Red and Blue America

States have a surprising degree of autonomy to block President Trump’s changes to Obamacare—and liberal-leaning states are already making their move.