Food Stamps Fall Short of Meal Costs in Most Counties, Study Finds

The findings come at a time when the Trump administration has proposed lower spending on the program in the coming years.

The Rush to Replenish Blood Supplies After Mass-Casualty Events

An estimated 38 percent of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood. Less than 10 percent of that population actually do.

Why Police Backing Is Key to Needle Exchanges

Nationwide, the list of syringe exchanges, both official and unofficial, has grown by about 15 percent a year for the past three years, with the fastest growth in Kentucky, North Carolina and Ohio.

The Opioid Epidemic Has Cost the U.S. More Than $1 Trillion

Most of the financial cost of the crisis came in the form of lost earning and productivity potential for those who had died.

Meet West Virginia’s New Drug Czar: Dr. Michael Brumage

“The main thing I want to bring with me to the table is an all-hands approach,” Brumage told Route Fifty. “This is not just about law enforcement and it’s not just about public health.”

Seema Verma: Medicaid Work Requirements Are ‘True Compassion’

Now that the Trump administration has approved work requirement waivers in two states—Kentucky and Indiana—as many as 11 more could follow.

Some Hospitals in Appalachia See Surges of Opioid Babies

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Maine Gov. LePage plans major shift in oversight for county jails; Philly will soon say goodbye to a transit relic; New Mexico’s challenging job-skills gap; and a Silicon Valley mayor is criticized for his housing comments.

As Trump Attacks the Federal Health Law, Some States Try to Shore it Up

Charlottesville’s premium spike may be an anomaly. But insurance experts say it could be an indication of what might happen in other parts of the country next fall, when insurers post their final rates for 2019.

15 Kentuckians Sue Trump Administration Over New Medicaid Waiver

The plaintiffs contend that waivers that require work as a prerequisite for health coverage will cause “irreparable harm to the health and welfare of the poorest and most vulnerable in our country.”

N.Y.C. Mayor: Big Pharma Is ‘Hooking Millions of Americans in Exchange for Profit’

STATE & LOCAL ROUNDUP: U.S. Conference of Mayors winter meeting starting in D.C.; Minnesota county bars federal immigration detainees over high costs; and new concerns over contaminated water in a Michigan city.

The CHIP Reauthorization Saga Is Over But the Damage Has Already Been Done

State officials aren’t likely to forget this episode of Congressional paralysis—and the precedent it set—any time soon.

The Big Challenge Public Health Officials Face as ‘Flint Registry’ Launches

A new federally-funded initiative seeks to connect residents impacted by the drinking-water crisis to wellness and recovery programs and resources.

'Safety Net' Hospitals Face Federal Budget Cuts

The cuts come at a time when many rural hospitals already are struggling to keep their doors open.

Injection Sites Provide Safe Spots to Shoot Up

Supervised drug injection facilities are being proposed in a growing number of cities and states to stem overdose deaths and help people find treatment.

Kentucky’s Medicaid Waiver Will Do More Than Just Require People to Work

The state’s waiver would also impose monthly premiums on beneficiaries, and threatens six-month program lockouts on individuals who do not comply with Medicaid rules.

States OK’d to Test Impacts of Work Requirements for Medicaid Beneficiaries

The new guidelines would allow states to force some able-bodied childless adults to work as a condition for eligibility for the federal program.

Likely to Come Soon From the Trump Administration: Guidelines for Medicaid Work Requirements

Experts speculate that Kentucky could be the first state to see its work requirement waiver approved—a move that could mean 95,000 fewer enrollees in that state over the next five years.