Congress May Resurrect Earmarks. In Some States, They Never Went Away

States say earmarks unclog the wheels of government. But what about wasteful spending?

Contempt for Court

Republican lawmakers are increasingly showing disdain for decisions made by the judicial branch—and by extension the rule of law.

Motorcycle Lane-Splitting: Safe or Scary?

Opponents and supporters of the practice say their approach is safest—for drivers and motorcyclists alike.

Welcome Robot Overlords! Now We Can Get Some Real Work Done.

Despite tech transforming government, public employees aren’t concerned for their jobs. Maybe because it’s letting them focus on the work they signed up for.

Taxpayers Don’t Want to Pay for Lawmakers’ Sexual Misdeeds, But Alternatives Pose Problems

Holding individual lawmakers, and not the government, responsible for sexual harassment might lessen the incentive for legislatures to train and police their own.

Meet West Virginia’s New Drug Czar: Dr. Michael Brumage

“The main thing I want to bring with me to the table is an all-hands approach,” Brumage told Route Fifty. “This is not just about law enforcement and it’s not just about public health.”

Proposed Trump Budget Cuts to States Not Happening. At Least Not Yet.

ANALYSIS: New Jersey’s former comptroller and budget director offers insights on the complexities of the federal appropriations process.

Federal Reform, Slow Revenue Growth Pressure States

Despite the third-longest U.S. economic recovery on record, lackluster growth in state tax collections has left many policymakers with little wiggle room to balance their budgets.

The End of the Custom Technology Era

The public sector is still waking up to the realities of the cloud software market.

Traffic Deaths Have Gone Up. What Can Governors Do About it?

"If we had 100 people lost to natural disasters or terrorist attacks every day, we would mobilize immediately," said Deborah Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council.

An End to Gerrymandering in Ohio?

A bipartisan compromise that just passed the state Senate would require minority-party support for political maps, and would limit the number of communities that could be splintered.

The Shutdown Ended. Utah Wants Its Money Back.

As Congress stares down yet another deadline, state leaders once again may have to decide whether to open their own wallets to protect their local tourism industries.

National Governors Association to Ramp Up State Cyber Assistance

As more smart communities emerge, states are being encouraged to get policy frameworks in place that secure the front end of disruptive technologies being adopted.

Federal Watchdog: State Reporting Gaps Limit Assisted Living Oversight

"This report finds that thousands of seniors face serious health and safety risks in their assisted living facilities,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren said of the Government Accountability Office findings.

Seema Verma: Medicaid Work Requirements Are ‘True Compassion’

Now that the Trump administration has approved work requirement waivers in two states—Kentucky and Indiana—as many as 11 more could follow.

Payday-Lending Lobbyists Swarm Indiana Statehouse

In the Obama era, the industry turned to state lawmakers to make its case. That strategy doesn’t seem to be changing.