Health & Human Services

Shouldn’t There be a Law Against Reckless Opioid Sales? Turns Out, There Is

COMMENTARY | The massive scale of prescription opioid shipments as the ongoing overdose epidemic unfolded has started to come into focus.

Rural America Has a Maternal Mortality Problem. Midwives Might Help Solve It.

Hospitals are shutting down across rural America, creating a shortage of care.

A New Flint? Another City Hands Out Bottled Water Because of Lead Concerns

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Six police officers shot and injured in Philadelphia standoff … Plastic bags killing cattle in Texas … Governors of Kansas and Missouri end “border war”

This State Official Would Like You to Mail Her Your Ticks

Patti Casey, an environmental surveillance program manager for the state of Vermont, oversees three tick-monitoring programs, including one where she collects ticks by mail from residents.

Kids With Lead Poisoning Will Get Early Help in These States

Experts say it’s most effective to intervene before the age of 5.

As States Strive To Stabilize Insurance Marketplaces, Insurers Return

Experts say that insurers re-entering state marketplace is a sign that the marketplaces are becoming more robust and less risky for insurers, despite ongoing political and legal battles over the ACA.

Where Doctors Can Recommend Marijuana to Replace Opioids

Some states allow people with opioid addictions to get a medical marijuana card, but many medical experts oppose those policies.

Hepatitis A Races Across The Country

In the wake of the opioid crisis, the highly communicable hepatitis A virus is spreading in more than half the states and making its way into the general public. Underfunded health officials are valiantly trying to fight it with vaccines.

Green Card Denials Possible for Immigrants Who Use Food Stamps, Housing Vouchers

Under a rule published Monday by the Trump administration, immigrants could be denied green cards based on their use or potential use of federal public assistance programs.

To Save Money, American Patients And Surgeons Meet In Cancun

The patient is from Mississippi. The surgeon is from Wisconsin. They meet in a Mexican resort for knee replacement surgery. Because the care costs so much less than in the U.S, the patient’s health plan pays her $5,000.

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The Drop in Drug Overdose Deaths Missed Some States

The number of fatal drug overdoses dipped by 5% in the United States last year, but in Missouri deaths increased 16 percent. Experts blame the uptick in deaths on the influx of fentanyl sold in the state.

The Country's Most Sweeping Paid Family Leave Policy Just Became Law

Oregon's policy, signed by Gov. Kate Brown Friday, guarantees 12 paid weeks of leave, extends benefits to non-traditional family members and guarantees wages for low-income workers, among other things.

A Local Government Strategy to Reduce Smoking: Refuse to Hire Smokers

Across the country, cities and counties have instituted policies that bar people who use any nicotine products from applying to government jobs.

The New West: Smoke In The Sky, A Purifier At Home

Amid forecasts for increasingly unhealthy air due to wildfire smoke, residents in Western states are snatching up home air purifiers. With good reason.

Pregnant But Hours From a Hospital? A Push to Examine Rural Maternal Health

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | California allows religious symbols on doors … Republicans in Connecticut ask health commissioner not to weigh in on vaccines … Chicago Mayor calls for interstate gun loopholes to close.

If You Smoke Pot, Your Anesthesiologist Needs To Know

Colorado is on the front lines in dealing with how marijuana use affects surgery. Lessons learned on operating tables and in recovery rooms have prompted calls for more research on marijuana nationwide.

Drugmakers Master Rolling Out Their Own Generics To Stifle Competition

Lawmakers who created the modern generic-drug industry in the 1980s never imagined anything like this—brand-pharma companies maximizing profits by appearing to compete with themselves.

There Aren’t Enough Doctors to Treat HIV in the South

The South sees more new HIV cases than the rest of the nation combined.