A Water-Stressed World Turns to Desalination

Desalination is increasingly being used to provide drinking water around the globe. But it remains expensive and creates its own environmental problems.

Hair Braiders Go to Court Over Licensing Requirements

Twenty-seven states do not require licenses for hair braiding, but in Louisiana braiders must complete 500 hours of hands-on training or risk $5,000 fines.

Lack of Medication-Assisted Treatment Impeding Opioid Response in West Virginia, Nurse Tells Congress

Medical experts offered their assessment of the federal government’s approach to combating the opioid crisis before the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

Texas Is Latest State To Attack Surprise Medical Bills

Under the new law, insurance companies and medical providers can enter into arbitration to negotiate a payment — and state officials would oversee that process.

How 10 Cities Are Testing What Works to Increase Economic Mobility

COMMENTARY | City leaders are tapping into data to figure out policies that will improve the prospects of people struggling in communities across the country

It's Getting Easier to Find Out If a Beach Might Make You Sick

Chicago is the only major U.S. city to use a new method to test for bacteria at most of its beaches—and then issue same-day swimming advisories.

Southern Farmers Reckon With Push to Raise Tobacco-Buying Age

More than a dozen states have passed legislation and a federal bill has momentum.

Drug Users Armed With Naloxone Double As Medics On Streets Of San Francisco

Data suggests that in San Francisco, the users may be reversing as many overdoses as paramedics — or more.

American Patients Are the Worst in the World

COMMENTARY | Americans are hypochondriacs, yet we skip our checkups. We demand drugs we don’t need, and fail to take the ones we do. No wonder the U.S. leads the world in health spending.

Coaxing Veterans Into Treatment to Prevent Suicides

In South Carolina, veteran suicide prevention starts with a phone call.

The Misplaced Optimism in Legal Pot

A new study throws cold water on hopes that more liberal cannabis policies could stem the opioid epidemic.

How Measles Detectives Work To Contain An Outbreak

Across the nation, public health departments are redirecting scarce resources to try to control the spread of measles. Their success relies on shoe-leather detective work that is one of the great untold costs of the measles resurgence.

What Do States Mean When They Say ‘Public Option’?

Washington last month became the first state to enact a “public option” for health insurance.

Juvenile Justice Reform Sets Us On a Path to End Youth Homelessness

COMMENTARY | In Washington state, thousands of young people are locked up annually for “status offenses” and find themselves homeless when leaving detention. A new law seeks to change that.

Why Hundreds of Puffins Washed Up Dead on an Alaskan Beach

This latest mass-mortality event is another sign of the Arctic’s rapidly changing climate.

Why Thousands Are Getting Hit with Unexpected Medical Bills

COMMENTARY | In my view as a health care policy researcher, the increasing occurrence of surprise medical bills is not an accident.

'Thinking Differently': How One County Teaches First Responders About Autism

The training program in Dutchess County, New York is part of a larger county initiative aimed at improving life for people with special needs.

State Lowers Degree Requirements for Child Welfare Case Workers

The move in Oregon comes amid concerns about workforce diversity and recruiting and retaining employees.