There Might Be a Cheaper Drug, But Pharmacists Can’t Tell You That

State legislatures consider proposals to eliminate the so-called gag rules that pharmacists say can prevent them from telling customers about cheaper drugs.

Housing Affordability Rises on the National Agenda

Corporations are teaming with mayors to boost the issue’s visibility.

A Dismal Compliance Rate for Florida Nursing Homes

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Capping city manager pay in California … N.Y.C. halts expansion of composting program … and resettling Hawaii residents displaced by lava.

What Virginia's Vote Means for the Future of Medicaid Expansion

With state legislators deciding this week to extend the program to 400,000 citizens, the drawn-out battle over Obamacare’s signature provision draws nearer to an end.

Trump Wants Medicaid to Push for Lower Drug Prices—But Will Patients Be Hurt?

Five states will be able to experiment with negotiating directly with drugmakers to lower prices. They can also close their formularies, so they don't need to cover all prescription drugs.

Everyone's Welcome: Saving Families With Movie Nights and Meetups

Can family enrichment centers help keep kids out of foster care?

Why States Worry That 'Association Health Plans' Will Be Magnets for Scam Artists

Some insurance regulators agitate for power to regulate plans to ensure consumers are protected.

1 in 5 Americans Know Someone Who Has Been Addicted to Opioids

A Federal Reserve study looked at how people assessed the state of their local economy and the national economy, to see if the “deaths of despair” hypothesis of the opioid abuse crisis held true.

How Fit Is Your City?

The American College of Sports Medicine fitness index ranks the country’s 100 largest cities based on a mix of factors, including health behaviors and local policies.

How N.Y.C. Is Forging Strategic Partnerships to Address Its Affordability Crisis

The city is already expanding access to computer science education and mental health treatment.

Legal Sports Betting Is About to Sweep the Nation. Services for Gambling Addicts Probably Won’t.

Only 17 states pay for one or more full-time staff positions to help problem gamblers, according to a 2016 survey from the National Council on Problem Gambling and the Association of Problem Gambling Service Administrators.

Atlanta’s Ransomware Attack Has Lingering Impacts

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Some Kansas higher ed funds restored … Louisiana state lawmakers have fist fight … Michigan leaders have unexpected revenue to use.

Millions of SNAP Recipients Would Fall Short of Proposed Work Requirements

If the changes went into effect today, 5.2 million people would fail to meet the new requirements in a given month, according to analysis from the Urban Institute.

‘No Silver Bullet’ for Opioid Crisis in Philadelphia, Other Urban Areas

A mix of education, treatment, and other measures shows promise, experts say.

Egg-Caused Salmonella Outbreak Leads to the Largest U.S. Recall Since 2010

The Food and Drug Administration has traced the outbreak to a farm in Hyde County, North Carolina.

As Courts See Local Flood of Opioid Lawsuits, Litigation Strategies Can Vary By State

In Arkansas and other states, city and county associations have led a full-out charge against the pharmaceutical industry.

Dozens More Counties Join Opioid Lawsuits

The new lawsuits aim to “recover millions of dollars lost due to opiate addiction and drug overdoses that have taken so many lives in this country and greatly affected the lives of many.”

This Jobs Program Just Might Get People Back to Work

But creating evidence-based employment programs can be tricky.

Boston Officials Propose 'A Better Deal' for Public Housing

The proposal plans to reinvest in public housing and the 2.2 million lowest-income seniors, people with disabilities, families with children, and other individuals who live in public housing.