Infrastructure

Reducing Short Car Trips Could Provide Big Benefits, Trail Group Says

A new study tries to put a dollar value on what it would mean if more Americans traveled distances in the one to five mile range by foot or bicycle.

A Micromobility Experiment in Pittsburgh Aims to Get People Out of Their Cars

The Pittsburgh Micromobility Collective will create all-in-one mobility hubs near transit stops, to compete with Uber and Lyft and help commuters go car-free.

Climate Readiness Plan: Just (Let the Rivers) Go With the Flow

Washington is one of the rare states to have its own state-funded buyout and restoration program, one that is set up to remove development from flood-prone areas on an ongoing basis.

Inequality Is Slowing Cities to a Crawl

As big cities face a mobility crisis, tech companies are selling wealthy urbanites on the fantasy of escaping it.

More Frequent and Intense Tropical Storms Mean Less Recovery Time for the World’s Coastlines

COMMENTARY | More frequent and intense tropical storms have far-reaching ecological impacts on coastlines that last for months or years after storms pass.

The Best and Worst U.S. Places to Live Car-Free

College towns and big coastal cities top our ranking of the metros where it’s easiest to live without a car.

The Problem With Switching to Electric Cars

Switching to EVs en masse could help bring down planet-killing carbon emissions. But Americans also need to drive less, right now.

Sometimes, Lyft Wants You to Take Public Transit

Like its rival Uber, the ride-hailing company wants to be a one-stop mobility shop that integrates buses, trains, subways, and scooters.

Beyond Sticker Shock: Experts Urge Congress to Rethink Infrastructure Priorities

Policy experts say lawmakers should think more broadly about infrastructure goals rather than just focusing on a dollar amount to be spent.

A Loan Fund Aims to Spur Development Along a Midwest Commuter Rail Line

Banks in Northwest Indiana have pledged $25 million for the program, which will target a corridor outside of Chicago.

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Senate Transportation Funding Bill Would Cut Small Project Transit Grants

Legislation advanced by the Senate Appropriations Committee would cut funding for the Small Starts grants program from $526 million to $78 million.

Former Emergency Managers: Act Now Before the Next Storm

COMMENTARY | A former FEMA Administrator and former Florida emergency manager urge states and local governments to invest time and resources into preparing for future severe weather events.

Parking Reform Will Save the City

COMMENTARY | Cities that require builders to provide off-street parking trigger more traffic, sprawl, and housing unaffordability. But we can break the vicious cycle.

Busy Shipping River at a Standstill Until a Broken Barge Lock is Fixed

Thousands of tons of cargo are stuck on barges, as the closure on the Columbia River is expected to last until the end of the month.

Very Bad Bus Signs and How to Make Them Better

Clear wayfinding displays can help bus riders feel more confident, and give a whole city’s public transportation system an air of greater authority.

Transit to the Trailhead: Bus Service in a Recreation Corridor Takes Off

Oregon’s Department of Transportation has seen strong demand among riders for buses that run between Portland and the Columbia River Gorge.

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

Nationwide, state insurance leaders and politicians have raised alarms about the slickly marketed membership campaigns.

Why Do City Dwellers Love to Hate Scooters?

COMMENTARY | Electric scooters draw a lot of hate, but if supported well by cities, they have the potential to provide a widespread and beneficial mode of transportation.

Report: Federal Flood Program Takes Years to Complete Home Buyouts

The five years it takes to complete a buyout of homes damaged by floods is too lengthy for many homeowners to endure, a new Natural Defense Resources Council study says.