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Majority of U.S. States Could Suffer as Canada Taxes Everything From Whiskey to Cucumbers

The Ambassador Bridge connects Detroit, Michigan with Windsor, Ontario.

The Ambassador Bridge connects Detroit, Michigan with Windsor, Ontario. Shutterstock

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

In 2017, 36 U.S. states counted Canada as their largest export market.

On Friday, the Canadian government released a long list of US products worth C$16.6 billion ($12.6 billion) that will be subject to new import taxes.

The taxes are a direct response to Donald Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs imposed in May, and will likely directly impact jobs and companies across the US. In 2017, 36 U.S. states counted Canada as their largest export market.

(via Quartz)

Dozens of steel products will be hit with 25 percent taxes, including forged steel, and several flat-rolled products (which are cut up to manufacture metal goods). Dozens more aluminum and consumer products will be taxed at 10 percent, in a move that will hit U.S. companies from beauty product suppliers to boat manufacturers to dairy farms. The list includes:

  • coffee, roasted (not decaf)
  • toilet paper
  • strawberry jam
  • mayonaise
  • ketchup
  • liquorice
  • prepared meats, bovine
  • cucumbers and gherkins
  • whiskies
  • hair lacquers
  • manicure and pedicure preparations
  • organic face washes
  • automatic dishwasher detergent
  • playing cards
  • ball point pens
  • inflatable boats

Overall, Canada is the US’s second-largest trading partner after China, the largest market for U.S. agriculture, and the U.S.’s most important security partner, as Quartz wrote earlier.

Canadian officials said they had no choice but to react to Trump’s tariffs. “It is with regret that we take these countermeasures, but the U.S. tariffs leave Canada no choice but to defend our industries, our workers and our communities,” said foreign minister Chrystia Freeland.

Heather Timmons writes for Quartz, where this article was originally published.

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