Tech & Data

Survey: More Than Half of Tech Employees ‘Dread’ Work Each Morning

Private-sector tech employees face growing anxiety and loneliness related to the coronavirus pandemic.

U.S., International Lawmakers Push Facebook to Stop Online Hate Targeting Women

The social media giant must more aggressively enforce rules that it already has in place, they said.

Licensed to Work: How Licensing Reform Can Contribute to Economic Recovery

COMMENTARY | Licensure reform will be critical to stimulating future job growth.

Census Bureau Says It Will Stop the Count A Month Early

Because of complications caused by the pandemic this spring, the Census Bureau had planned to keep counting people until Oct. 31.

Facial Recognition Algorithms Struggle to Detect Faces Under Masks, NIST Study Finds

A new study from the National Institute of Standards and Technology found facial recognition algorithms developed pre-pandemic struggle to identify masked faces.

Cities Turn to the Sewers to Track the Prevalence of Covid

Testing wastewater samples can give public health officials a heads up that an outbreak is looming, as people infected with SARS-Cov-2 shed the virus in their feces weeks before they begin showing symptoms.

Figuring Out School Bus Routes Is More Complicated Than Ever. Districts Are Turning to Technology for Help.

In places where kids go to in-person school, buses will look different this year as systems deal with the challenges of transporting kids during a pandemic.

Contact Tracing Demonstrates Need for National Privacy Laws, Lawmaker Says

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers said the technology being developed to aid the fight against coronavirus proves the need for a standardized privacy framework.

In Bid to Boost Tech Workforce, University of Florida Develops 'Fastest' Academic Supercomputer

The artificial intelligence-rooted supercomputer, built in part with funding from Nvidia, will be used in AI-centric courses. The university has to hiring 100 new faculty members who are focused on the evolving technology.

How One City Went Virtual In 30 Days

The southern California city of El Cajon moved to paperless permitting in just under a month, a project that had originally been expected to take a year.

Report: Governments Should Turn to AI Before Disaster Strikes

The technology could help forecast future and impending disasters in real time, assess damage in the aftermath, and predict and evaluate impacts.

One-Third of U.S. Workers Want Permanent Remote Work

A new Morning Consult survey finds many workers would like to continue working from home after the coronavirus pandemic recedes and some would likely move to a new city or state if remote work becomes permanent.

A Blueprint for How State Leaders Can Achieve Better Results

COMMENTARY | Data and evidence can help state policymakers make thoughtful decisions on public health, economics, equity and other issues.

3% of Americans Moved Due to the Coronavirus Outbreak

A survey by the Pew Research Center found that Americans were most likely to have moved either to reduce their risk of infection or because their college campus closed.

One City’s Plan to Help Local Businesses by Funding a Cash Rewards Program

As Akron, Ohio grapples with fallout from the coronavirus, the city is working to launch a mobile app where people will earn “blimp” credits for local purchases. The credits can then be used like currency at other area establishments.

Looking to Upgrade Your IT System? Try Standing Up a Digital Services Team

COMMENTARY | Governments are running on IT systems that are too antiquated and complex to be effective. In light of the pressures caused by Covid-19, digital service teams are needed to help government officials upgrade their IT systems to better serve the public.

As Virus Keeps Kids From Schools, New Figures Show Millions Lack Home Internet

Meanwhile, a California education official this week said it would take at least $500 million to get students there the computers and internet access they need, and asked the private sector to help.

States Urge Congress to Help with Skyrocketing Tech Costs

As the coronavirus pandemic escalated, states spent big on information technology as employees started working from home and antiquated systems like unemployment websites needed fast upgrades.

School Districts Deploy WiFi-Equipped Buses to Expand Broadband Access for Students

School districts across the country are sending buses with WiFi to neighborhoods with limited broadband access to help students connect for full-time distance learning.

Would You Sacrifice Your Privacy to Get Out of Quarantine?

The coronavirus has reignited the post-9/11 debate about security and civil liberties. The U.S. response to that tragedy has lessons for how to manage the trade-offs this time around.