Public Education

One State's Request to Pause Standardized Testing for Students

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said this week he would request a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education for standardized testing in the coming school year, citing disruptions and budget shortfalls from the coronavirus pandemic.

Virginia Plots Fall School Reopening, With Some Students Likely Back in Classrooms

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS ROUNDUP | Louisville police release nearly blank incident report in Breonna Taylor shooting … New Jersey freezes lead pipe plans … Georgia election problems to be investigated.

Coronavirus Will Have an Unequal Impact on School Budgets

Districts that can largely support themselves with local tax dollars are in a better position as the economic downturn continues.

California’s Largest University System To Go Online This Fall—Will Other Schools Follow?

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Texas AG slams city coronavirus restrictions as going too far … South Carolina to delay budget debate … State attorneys general demand safety information from Amazon.

With Traditional Rites of Passage on Hold, High School Principals Find New Ways to Honor Graduating Seniors

Prom and graduation are canceled because of coronavirus, but high school principals across the country are working to make sure that seniors still feel special.

School Districts Deploy WiFi-Equipped Buses to Expand Broadband Access for Students

School districts across the country are sending buses with WiFi to neighborhoods with limited broadband access to help students connect for full-time distance learning.

Ready or Not, Schools Shift to Full-Time Virtual Learning

In many of the districts closed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, school officials are trying to figure out how to connect students while they prepare online lesson plans.

Switch to Remote Learning Could Leave Students With Disabilities Behind

The U.S. Department of Education has told districts that they should not let concerns over how to reach students with disabilities stop them from offering distance learning.

The College President Who Simply Won’t Raise Tuition

Mitch Daniels has frozen Purdue’s tuition—at less than $10,000—for seven straight years.

Teachers Unions Urge End of Active-Shooter Drills that Can Traumatize Students

In a new report, two teachers unions and a gun-control group recommend that schools stop using active-shooter drills—or at least revise them—amid fears the exercises are terrifying and damaging to students.

Do Older Taxpayers Balk at Supporting Schools?

COMMENTARY | In certain places, opponents to new school taxes are finding success by courting older voters.

A State Could Require Schools to Play the National Anthem Weekly

An Alabama lawmaker said he decided to sponsor a bill after noticing that schools did not play the anthem at all sporting events.

What School Could Be If It Were Designed for Kids With Autism

Tracy Murray’s kindergarten classroom in New York City has a unique approach to supporting students on the spectrum.

South Carolina Lawmaker Wants to Mandate Media Literacy Classes

The proposal would aim to create a media literacy curriculum for public schools by the 2021-2022 school year.

A State Could Become the First to Fund Searches for Remains of MIA Soldiers

State legislators hope to fund a University of Wisconsin program that identifies remains of missing soldiers, allowing researchers to focus on finding service members from the Dairy State.

A Teenager Needed a Tampon. When Her School Didn't Have One, She Called Her Legislator

A Pennsylvania teen teamed up with a state representative to write legislation that would require schools to provide free pads and tampons for students.

Legislators Aim to Curb Anti-Semitism by Requiring Classes on the Holocaust

A proposed bill would make Massachusetts the 13th state to mandate students learn about the Holocaust as part of public school curriculum.

Preventing Student Violence Through Education

A proposal in Ohio would require public middle and high schools to teach an annual class about suicide and violence prevention.

Arrests of 6-Year-Olds Show the Perils of Putting Police in Elementary Schools

COMMENTARY | About one-third of America's elementary schools have a school police officer on hand. Do these officers make schools safer, or are they turning primary schools into mini police precincts?

Tightening Requirements for Vaccine Exemptions

Under a new law in California, state public health officials will have final authority over the validity of children's medical exemptions for vaccinations.