Public Education

A Teenager Needed a Tampon. When Her School Didn't Have One, She Called Her Legislator

A Pennsylvania teen teamed up with a state representative to write legislation that would require schools to provide free pads and tampons for students.

Legislators Aim to Curb Anti-Semitism by Requiring Classes on the Holocaust

A proposed bill would make Massachusetts the 13th state to mandate students learn about the Holocaust as part of public school curriculum.

Preventing Student Violence Through Education

A proposal in Ohio would require public middle and high schools to teach an annual class about suicide and violence prevention.

Arrests of 6-Year-Olds Show the Perils of Putting Police in Elementary Schools

COMMENTARY | About one-third of America's elementary schools have a school police officer on hand. Do these officers make schools safer, or are they turning primary schools into mini police precincts?

Tightening Requirements for Vaccine Exemptions

Under a new law in California, state public health officials will have final authority over the validity of children's medical exemptions for vaccinations.

What Happened After a School District Began Feeding Students Breakfast in Classrooms

Springfield Public Schools offer free breakfast to all students in their classrooms, helping boost attendance and graduation rates while decreasing hunger across the Massachusetts school district.

How to Increase Access to Gifted Programs for Low-income, Black and Latino Children

COMMENTARY | New York City could be on the verge of dismantling gifted programs at its elementary and middle schools. Taking that step could make things even worse for some of the children it aims to help.

Inside One School District's Virtual Classroom

In West Virginia, state law allows K-12 schools to offer virtual curriculum while maintaining their levels of per-pupil funding.

The School Districts Serving Free Lunch to All Students

Tapping into a federal program, more school districts are providing free lunches for all students. Atlanta is among those opting in this school year.

The Whiter, Richer School District Right Next Door

Public schools’ dependence on local property taxes means some districts get isolated from the financial resources in their communities.

K-12 Spending Sees Gains, But Still Lags in Many States, Teachers Union Says

An analysis of 2017 data finds education funding remains below pre-recession levels in over a third of states.

Featured eBooks

There’s a Generational Shift in the Debate Over Busing

COMMENTARY | Kamala Harris took part in a bold experiment as a child—and the experiences of her generation may transform the debate over desegregation.

A Statewide Safety System for Students

Middle and high-school students in North Carolina can anonymously report safety tips by app in the coming school year as part of a partnership between the state and nonprofit Sandy Hook Promise.

Out of Order: Schools Quash Delivery Food Trend

Citing security and nuisance concerns, school districts from California to Delaware are cracking down on students ordering up lunch on UberEats or other apps.

Teachers Earn Less Than Their Private-Sector Counterparts, Research Shows

Teachers have a 21.4 percent "wage penalty" compared to college graduates with similar education and experience, according to new research from the Economic Policy Institute.

The Other Kind of School Segregation

COMMENTARY | The public focuses its attention on divides between schools, while tracking has created separate and unequal education systems within single schools.

The Children of the Children of Columbine

Twenty years after the shooting at Columbine High School, some survivors—now parents themselves—are figuring out how to talk to their kids about lockdown drills.

Florida Supreme Court to Weigh Government Liability in Parkland Shooting

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Alabama tornados and fatalities ... A Kentucky city is creating a registry of convicted animal abusers ... Closures of "board-and-care" homes in California.

The Utter Inadequacy of America’s Efforts to Desegregate Schools

In 1966, a group of Boston-area parents and administrators created a busing program called METCO to help desegregate schools. They thought of it as a quick fix to a passing problem. But the problem hasn’t passed, and METCO isn’t enough to fix it.

U.S. Education Dept. Sued Over Blocking Access to Advocacy Group’s Website From Within Office Building

Alleged Wi-Fi block violates the First Amendment and the Administrative Procedure Act, complaint argues.