Public Health

Rural America Has a Maternal Mortality Problem. Midwives Might Help Solve It.

Hospitals are shutting down across rural America, creating a shortage of care.

This State Official Would Like You to Mail Her Your Ticks

Patti Casey, an environmental surveillance program manager for the state of Vermont, oversees three tick-monitoring programs, including one where she collects ticks by mail from residents.

Kids With Lead Poisoning Will Get Early Help in These States

Experts say it’s most effective to intervene before the age of 5.

It’s Surprisingly Hard to Find Out How Rats Move Through Cities

COMMENTARY | To address rodent-related concerns, it’s useful to know how rats travel. Genetic testing might hold some answers.

Where Doctors Can Recommend Marijuana to Replace Opioids

Some states allow people with opioid addictions to get a medical marijuana card, but many medical experts oppose those policies.

Hepatitis A Races Across The Country

In the wake of the opioid crisis, the highly communicable hepatitis A virus is spreading in more than half the states and making its way into the general public. Underfunded health officials are valiantly trying to fight it with vaccines.

The Drop in Drug Overdose Deaths Missed Some States

The number of fatal drug overdoses dipped by 5% in the United States last year, but in Missouri deaths increased 16 percent. Experts blame the uptick in deaths on the influx of fentanyl sold in the state.

A Local Government Strategy to Reduce Smoking: Refuse to Hire Smokers

Across the country, cities and counties have instituted policies that bar people who use any nicotine products from applying to government jobs.

The New West: Smoke In The Sky, A Purifier At Home

Amid forecasts for increasingly unhealthy air due to wildfire smoke, residents in Western states are snatching up home air purifiers. With good reason.

There Aren’t Enough Doctors to Treat HIV in the South

The South sees more new HIV cases than the rest of the nation combined.

The Brain-Eating Amoeba Is a Nearly Perfect Killer

The single-celled menace rarely infects humans. That’s what makes it so hard to treat.

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'Deaths of Despair' Theory Overlooks Other Factors, Researchers Say

A lifetime of poverty and hard work contributes more broadly to the growing mortality gap between low-income people and those who are better off than drug overdoses and suicides, according to new research.

Sobering Up: In An Alcohol-Soaked Nation, More Seek Booze-Free Social Spaces

A national trend of boozeless bars is cropping up nationwide to create social spaces without the hangovers, DUIs and alcoholism culture. It’s part of a new push for sober options.

To Raise Money to Combat Opioid Addiction, One State Hikes Licensing Fees for Drug Companies

A new Minnesota law will increase prescription opioid manufacturer licensing fees from $235 to $55,000 and is expected to generate about $20 million that will fund the state’s opioid prevention and treatment strategies.

Lack of Medication-Assisted Treatment Impeding Opioid Response in West Virginia, Nurse Tells Congress

Medical experts offered their assessment of the federal government’s approach to combating the opioid crisis before the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

Drug Users Armed With Naloxone Double As Medics On Streets Of San Francisco

Data suggests that in San Francisco, the users may be reversing as many overdoses as paramedics — or more.

Coaxing Veterans Into Treatment to Prevent Suicides

In South Carolina, veteran suicide prevention starts with a phone call.

How Measles Detectives Work To Contain An Outbreak

Across the nation, public health departments are redirecting scarce resources to try to control the spread of measles. Their success relies on shoe-leather detective work that is one of the great untold costs of the measles resurgence.