Public Safety

Teachers Unions Urge End of Active-Shooter Drills that Can Traumatize Students

In a new report, two teachers unions and a gun-control group recommend that schools stop using active-shooter drills—or at least revise them—amid fears the exercises are terrifying and damaging to students.

Ban or Regulate Kratom? State Lawmakers Weigh Approaches to Herbal Supplement

The American Kratom Association is lobbying lawmakers to adopt regulations that set ground rules for the supplement, which the FDA advises people not to consume, instead of joining six states that ban it as a controlled substance.

Leaving Scooter Regulation to Local Government

A bill moving through the Georgia legislature would clarify that making the rules for electric scooters is the business of local governments.

The Cities Where Car Accidents Happen Most Often

Houston, Charlotte and Los Angeles had the most accidents in the country last year, according to data from a transportation nonprofit.

This State Offers Grants to Police to Pay for Extradition of Wanted Suspects

In Ohio, some law enforcement agencies said the cost to extradite was too high. To help agencies cover the costs, the governor’s office has made $500,000 in grant funding available.

American Law Does Not Take Rape Seriously

COMMENTARY | Permeating every moment of Harvey Weinstein’s trial is the disturbing history of sexual-assault prosecution in America.

Fighting Wildfire With Fire: New Study Looks at Barriers to ‘Prescribed’ Burns

Researchers say that millions of acres of California forest is in need of preventative measures to help lower wildfire risks.

Vast Majority of Mayors Believe Their Cities Are Too Car-Oriented, Survey Finds

But the city leaders also voice skepticism of cutting back on public parking or lowering speed limits.

Five States Diverted 911 Fees For Other Purposes, FCC Says

Montana was removed from the list of states shamed by the federal agency after the state banned the practice of diverting these funds.

A Vermont Lawmaker Calls for Cell Phone Age Limits

A new proposal, which points out all the other things young people aren't allowed to do, would restrict cell phone usage to residents over the age of 21.

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Kansas City Sues Gunmaker and Others Over Alleged Firearm Trafficking

The lawsuit by the Missouri city is the first one a municipality has filed against the gun industry in over 10 years, officials say.

How One Election May Have Shifted the Bar for Gun Control

After winning control of the Virginia statehouse, Democrats in 2020 are poised to pass gun control measures. It’s already set up a battle with local leaders in conservative parts of the state.

A Stunning Vote Reversal in a Controversial First Amendment Case

Are protest organizers liable for violence that happens at their events?

A Town Moves Forward After Two 'Thousand-Year' Storms

After two historic floods in less than two years, officials in Ellicott City, Maryland, are putting their hopes in a long-term rebuilding plan that officials say aims to balance recovery and resiliency with historic preservation.

Ranking States Based on ‘Bike Friendliness’ Amid an Uptick in Serious Crashes

"It’s the responsibility of state DOTs to take action to make it safer for people biking," says the author of a new report.

Cities Target Alcohol Licensing As a Way to Fight Crime

A new report recognizes cities that have made efforts to enhance community safety by limiting alcohol availability.

With ‘Outlier’ 2nd Amendment Case, Supreme Court Could Raise Bar for Gun Laws

The New York City case gives the court a chance to tighten the standards that lower courts use to decide whether firearms regulations are constitutional.

Local Governments Offer Tips on Deep Frying a Thanksgiving Turkey Without Burning the House Down

Every year, people run into problems frying turkeys. Fire departments and other local officials have suggestions on how to prevent serious mishaps.

Drug Deals And Food Gone Bad Plague Corner Stores. How Neighbors Are Fighting Back.

Corner stores that provide groceries for those using the federal food stamp program have become magnets for violence just outside St. Louis. Now local residents are putting their feet down.