A World Where School Shootings Feel Inevitable

“It’s been happening everywhere. I've always kind of felt like eventually it was going to happen here, too.”

So States Ban Bump Stocks. Now How Do They Enforce the Law?

New Jersey is not the only state having trouble enforcing its ban. In Massachusetts, where residents had until February to surrender their bump stocks, State Police received just three devices.

With Kilauea Off Limits, New Mexico Has Its Own Kilauea-Like Spot to Check Out

Officials in Hawaii, for good reason, want you to steer clear of the danger zone on the Big Island. But a location on the mainland shows what can happen when lava oozes across the landscape.

Multiple Cities Face Legal Challenges Over Anti-Panhandling Laws

“... [W]henever a new city does consider passing a new panhandling law where they didn’t have one before, they’re immediately either sued or they get a lot of pushback,” according to Cleveland State University law professor Joseph Mead.

‘Ghost Cars’ Coming to Haunt North Carolina’s Impaired Drivers

State Highway Patrol officers have a new low-key weapon for drunk-driving enforcement.

Triage and Response Lessons From the Las Vegas Shooting

Emergency Management Administrator Carolyn Levering shares key takeaways from how local agencies dealt with the mass-casualty event.

The Pentagon Is Making a Ray Gun to Stop Truck Attacks

A device that resembles an old phonograph may soon be used to jam and shut down vehicles like the one that killed 10 people in Toronto.

Virginia’s New 9-1-1 Law Has Origins in High School Classroom

Last week, Gov. Ralph Northam approved legislation that emerged as a lawmaking exercise by students.

A Salmonella Recall Is Affecting 207 Million Eggs Across the U.S.

About 1 million people in the U.S. get sick from salmonella every year, with about 19,000 people hospitalized and 380 deaths.

‘Unnecessary Fight’ Over Sanctuary Cities Could Cost Police Funding for Years

The U.S. Supreme Court is the quickest path to a national ruling that frees up $250 million and counting in Byrne JAG funds—possibly as soon as June 2019.

Mayors, Police Chiefs Confront State Preemption on Gun Safety

Local government officials gathered in Washington, D.C. for a public safety meeting, where they discussed active shooter event preparation and response.

Americans Say They’re Ready for Robots to Deliver the Mail

A survey conducted by the Postal Service inspector general polled citizens on how they would feel if a robot delivered the mail with—or instead of—a human.

The First Step to Safer Schools Is Funding Them

“There’s going to need to be more resources down the road,” according to West Palm Beach, Florida Police Chief Sarah Mooney.

AI Experts Want Government Algorithms to Be Studied Like Environmental Hazards

“If governments deploy systems on human populations without frameworks for accountability, they risk losing touch with how decisions have been made, thus rendering them unable to know or respond to bias, errors, or other problems,” according to a new report.

The Limits of Earthquake Early-Warning Alerts

Last week’s quake near L.A. shows the promise of the West Coast seismic notification system under development. But its effectiveness will depend on those using the technology.

Pizza, Pad Thai and Pot: Home Delivery of Marijuana Is Legal in These States

Lawmakers states that pioneered recreational marijuana legalization have been reluctant to allow home delivery, even in an era when consumers are used to getting more items delivered.

Violent Acts in Public Places Fuel Interest in Secure Design

But an architect who designs civic buildings urges a measured response instead of creating a “ballistic cocoon.”

Why It's Illegal to Roll Through Stop Signs on Your Bike—For Now

Many bicycle advocates see the "Idaho stop" as codifying what they already do at stop signs.