Social Services

Looming Work Requirements Demand A New Approach to Government Assistance

COMMENTARY | Instituting work requirements does not mean that people get jobs, keep jobs, or advance in jobs. The focus needs to be kept on the end game—economic stability and mobility—not administrative indicators.

Looming Work Requirements Demand A New Approach to Government Assistance

COMMENTARY | Instituting work requirements does not mean that people get jobs, keep jobs, or advance in jobs. The focus needs to be kept on the end game—economic stability and mobility—not administrative indicators.

Cities Scramble to Shelter Homeless as Bitter Cold Weather Sets In

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Chicago ticket and debt collection reforms … Denver minimum wage … N.C.’s hate crime increase … and an 18-year-old mayor’s agenda.

Veteran Homelessness Drops 5 Percent

There are now about 38,000 homeless veterans, according to federal agencies.

New Shelter for Domestic Violence Victims—and Their Pets

Brooklyn's newest domestic violence shelter allows abuse victims to move in with their pets, eliminating a key hurdle to seeking help.

Surging Economy Contributes to Decrease in Medicaid Enrollment

A report from the Kaiser Family Foundation outlined a .6 percent drop in Medicaid enrollment in 2018, the first since 2007.

Youth Homelessness Similar in Rural and Urban Communities, Research Suggests

Rural youth are as likely to experience homelessness as kids living in urban areas, but may have less access to support services.

Snapshots of America’s Homelessness Crisis in 4 Cities

From Seattle to Akron to Los Angeles and Minneapolis, here’s how local leaders and others are trying to provide shelter—or deny shelter—to those who desperately need stable housing.

How Indiana Is Taking On the Opioid Crisis

Looking at proposals for treatment system transformation, the substance use disorder workforce and underserved populations.

City’s Homeless Job-Training Program Provides Model to ‘Set People Up for Success’

“Give them a sense of pride in what they do and it engenders commitment,” said Stephanie Holloman, the human resources director in Riverside, California.

Mayors More Likely to Perceive Discrimination Nationally than Locally, Report Says

The survey, released by the National League of Cities, is based on interviews with 115 mayors from 39 states.

Testing Out Faster and Flexible Ways to Deploy Homeless Shelters and Services

Modular housing pilot projects in King County, Washington aim to create flexible and replicable prototypes of how to expand the number of beds and provide 24/7 case management.

Despite Economy, Working Families Struggle to Make Ends Meet

A recent report from the Urban Institute examined families' ability to pay for basic needs.

Court Rules First Amendment Could Protect Food Sharing

An appellate court last week found that the First Amendment covers a weekly shared meal at a Fort Lauderdale park where homeless people are known to congregate.

Thousands Could Lose Medicaid as 1st State Implements Work Requirements

Arkansas state officials say new requirements will help people get into the workforce. Advocates, however, contend they will just kick people out of the insurance program.

Why Crackdown Fears May Keep Legal Immigrants From Food Stamps

Some groups that cater to immigrant communities report a drop in food stamp applicants.

Champion of '211' Call Centers Set to Lead National Counties Group

“I’ve become, maybe, a fanatic about 211,” says San Diego County Supervisor Greg Cox, who's expected to be the next president of the National Association of Counties.

If Forced to Provide Job Training to Food Stamp Recipients, Many States Couldn't

One idea on the table as House and Senate negotiators wrangle over the farm bill is work requirements for SNAP recipients. But that would also require states to run job training programs.

When Push Comes to Shove, Here Are Local Leaders' Priorities

Route Fifty asked local government officials what is most important to their communities’ future. Their answers may surprise you.

More Money—and Stricter Scrutiny—for Child Care

“What we’re seeing is an influx of state policymakers starting to wrap their arms around the fact that learning doesn’t start in kindergarten,” said Bruce Atchison of the Education Commission of the States.

Kentucky Not Giving Up on Medicaid Work Requirements After Judge’s Ruling

Gov. Matt Bevin says the plan is the best way to keep the popular program solvent. Critics say he’s ignoring key data and thousands risk losing coverage.