Voting Reform

Florida Lawmakers Look to Make Ex-Felons Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

The legislation comes months after voters overwhelmingly approved a measure restoring the voting rights of people convicted of felonies who have completed their sentences.

Elections Are Broken Because They Aren’t About the Voters

COMMENTARY | To improve our election system, let’s focus on who votes, not who wins.

Election Reforms in Colorado Lead to Surge of Unaffiliated Voters

Four months after the state’s open primary, unaffiliated general election voters turned out in record numbers.

Michigan Voters OK Proposal to Overhaul State’s Redistricting Process

Previous GOP-led district-drawing efforts gave Republicans an advantage in congressional and state legislative races.

Florida Voters Restore Voting Rights to Felons

Under Amendment 4, most people convicted of a felony will have their voting rights restored once their sentences are done, including completing parole.

What Government Can Do to Ensure Pretrial Detainees Can Vote

Election education and access to polls or polling materials are key, says the Democratic-leaning Center for American Progress.

Maine Voters Overrule Their Leaders

With support from Governor Paul LePage, the legislature nullified a statewide referendum approving ranked-choice voting. On Tuesday, the citizens got the final word and enacted it again.

Maine Governor: Ranked-Choice Voting Is the ‘Most Horrific Thing in the World’

But Paul LePage’s threat to not certify Tuesday’s election may be a hollow one.

Council of State Governments Extends Overseas Voting Initiative

The partnership will evaluate electronic ballot systems among other technologies and policies.

Maine's Fitful Experiment With a New Way of Voting

The state will be the first to implement ranked-choice voting in its June primaries, but not all the candidates will commit to accepting the results.

Thousands Lose Right to Vote Under 'Incompetence' Laws

Laws in 39 states and Washington, D.C., allow judges to strip voting rights from people with mental disorders ranging from schizophrenia to Down syndrome who are deemed “incapacitated” or “incompetent.”

Voting Lines Are Shorter—But Mostly for Whites

Election officials have figured out how to keep voting lines down, but communities of color are still waiting longer to vote.

An End to Gerrymandering in Ohio?

A bipartisan compromise that just passed the state Senate would require minority-party support for political maps, and would limit the number of communities that could be splintered.

How Voters With Disabilities Are Blocked From the Ballot Box

In light of security concerns, states moved to paper ballots. Now voters with disabilities are losing access.

Has the Tide Turned Against Partisan Gerrymandering?

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday struck down the state’s maps as too heavily biased toward Republicans, the latest ruling in a new and contentious battle over legislative districts.

Trying to Build a Better Election Integrity Commission

The newly formed National Commission for Voter Justice intends to avoid the pitfalls that befell Trump’s group, ensuring transparency and accessibility as it investigates state barriers to voting.

Election Officials Attacked From All Sides on Purging Voter Rolls

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that promises the possibility of judicial guidance on how to maintain both access and integrity in local voter rolls.

Vulnerable Communities Lose Critical Documentation in Natural Disasters' Wake

Texas’s S.B. 5 voting ID law, struck down last week, could have had serious consequences for minority voters impacted by Tropical Storm Harvey.