News

The Tiny State Whose Laws Affect Workers Everywhere

Because so many companies are incorporated in Delaware, their cases fall under that state’s law, even when their operations and workforces are based elsewhere.

News

An Unsteady Future for New England's Suburbs

As people move to warmer climates and cities, small towns throughout the region are weathering decline.

News

A Middle-Class Stronghold’s Uncertain Future

As incomes fall across the nation, even better-off areas like Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, are faltering.

News

Is There a Better Way to Build a Stadium?

In the past, publicly financed arenas have left cities footing hefty bills. Now, the state of Wisconsin is putting $250 million into a new arena for the Milwaukee Bucks—will this venture be any different?

News

A Welfare Utopia in the Beaver State

Oregon, one of the whitest states in the union, also has one of the most generous safety nets. Is that a coincidence or something more troubling?

Management

Can Portland Avoid Repeating San Francisco’s Mistakes?

The city is facing a housing crisis, but despite its progressive reputation, it’s done little to ensure affordability for longtime residents.

News

The Folly of State-Level Tax Cuts

In a strong national economy, places like Louisiana, Illinois, and Oklahoma are nevertheless struggling. Why?

News

The American Neighborhoods Without Water, Sewers, or Building Codes

Low-income residents bought cheap land outside of border cities decades ago. But the promised infrastructure never came.

News

Budget Woes in One of America's Wealthiest Cities

If San Jose can’t afford its basic public services, what city can?

News

The Super Bowl and a Broken San Francisco

The NFL championship game descends on a city failing to deal with questions of affordability and inclusion.

Infrastructure

The Fleeting Allure of the Walkable Neighborhood

If El Paso and other Southwestern cities prove anything, it's that many residents just want space.

News

With Declining Oil Revenues, Alaska Targets Its Incarceration Costs

In the Last Frontier, a new prison reform plan could save nealy half a billion dollars.

News

New York Invests in Ex-Convicts

A promising initiative to reduce recidivism provides payouts to financial backers whose money yields results.

News

When the Government Tells Poor People How to Live

Residents in some public-housing units in Worcester, Massachusetts, must now get a job or go back to school. If they don’t, they’ll be evicted.

Management

The Housing Crisis Isn't Over for Some Americans

In some counties, the number of people who still owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth is climbing up from about 7.5 million.

Infrastructure

The Problem With Public Transit in Small Cities

Residents of booming metros like Charlotte and Nashville love their cars, so support—and justification—for expanding bus and rail systems is hard to find.

News

Tennessee Has the Most Regressive Tax System in America

The state, with its high sales taxes and no income tax, is asking poor people to pay far more than their fair share.

Management

Paying for Prison Beds

Economic incentives may deter judges and prosecutors from embracing harsh sentences, according to a new report.

News

Oil-Rich Alaska's Rude Awakening

Why can't the Last Frontier—with more than $50 billion in oil money banked—pay its bills?

Infrastructure

Aging Pipes Are Poisoning America's Tap Water

In Flint, Michigan, lead, copper, and bacteria are contaminating the drinking supply and making residents ill. If other cities fail to fix their old pipes, the problem could soon become a lot more common.