Author Archive

David A. Graham

David Graham is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics Channel. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.
Management

Missouri's Scandal-Tarnished Governor Resigns

Rather than face impeachment over allegations of sexual misconduct and violations of campaign-finance law, Eric Greitens is leaving Jefferson City.

Management

New York’s Double-Jeopardy Loophole

The state attorney general asked the legislature to change state law so that the president or his associates could be tried in New York even if pardoned under federal law.

Public Safety

The Baltimore Police Department Is Badly Broken

This week a detective gave stunning testimony about abuses by the city’s gun-trace task force and an officer was charged with fabricating evidence.

News

Has the Tide Turned Against Partisan Gerrymandering?

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday struck down the state’s maps as too heavily biased toward Republicans, the latest ruling in a new and contentious battle over legislative districts.

Management

North Carolina's Landmark Ruling Against Partisan Gerrymanders

Judges said redistricting designed to elect Republicans violated the Constitution, the first time a federal court has come to that conclusion.

Management

Memphis's Novel Strategy for Tearing Down Confederate Statues

In a surprise move Wednesday evening, the city sold two parks to a nonprofit corporation that promptly tore down monuments to Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis.

Infrastructure

Could Positive Train Control Have Prevented the Amtrak Cascades Wreck?

The NTSB said the train that derailed south of Seattle on Monday was traveling 80 miles per hour, 50 miles faster than the speed limit on the curve where it crashed.

Management

What's the Right Punishment for Tearing Down a Confederate Monument?

In Durham, the sheriff and district attorney appear divided over whether civil disobedience deserves greater leniency from the judicial system.

Management

How St. Louis Workers Won and Then Lost a Minimum-Wage Hike

After a Missouri law took effect on Monday, the wage floor in the city was reduced to $7.70 per hour after three months at $10 per hour—the latest case of a state cracking down on a city that had enacted a progressive policy.

Management

Local Officials Want to Remove Confederate Monuments—but States Won't Let Them

Laws preventing the removal of statues raise questions not only about historical legacy but also about local control and public safety.

News

Durham's Confederate Statue Comes Down

Unwilling to wait for local officials to act to take down a Civil War monument, a group of protesters took matters into their own hands Monday night.

Public Safety

Could Police Have Prevented Bloodshed in Charlottesville?

Neo-Nazis and counter-protesters alike think that local and state police should have done a better job keeping violence from breaking out over the weekend.

Public Safety

Trump's Vision of Lawless Order

The president suggests he sees the rule of law as an impediment to getting tough on crime.

Tech & Data

The Republican Backlash Against Trump's Vote-Fraud Commission

GOP secretaries of state have pushed back on a request for voter data, and former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff says it could endanger national security.

News

Facing Impeachment, Alabama's 'Luv Guv' Resigns

The proximate cause of Robert Bentley’s downfall was not sexual misconduct itself. It was another instance of the coverup being always worse than the crime.

Management

Stripping Miners of Safety Protections

A West Virginia proposal to help the coal industry by paring back safety regulations may actually protect neither miners or their jobs.

Infrastructure

How Did the Oroville Dam Crisis Get So Dire?

Drought, climate change, and aging infrastructure combined to create a looming catastrophe that forced 188,000 Californians to evacuate.

Public Safety

Baltimore Police Agree to Stop Abusing Their Power

Under a consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice, the troubled force will employ a variety of measures to protect constitutional rights and correct racial disparities.

News

U.S. Supreme Court Puts North Carolina's 2017 Elections on Hold

After a lower court ordered unusual legislative contests this year to mitigate unconstitutional racial gerrymandering, the justices temporarily stayed the order.

News

What's Behind the New Wave of Transgender 'Bathroom Bills'

Lawmakers in Texas, Kentucky, and Virginia are the latest to propose legislation that replicates North Carolina’s controversial law—despite the risk of backlash.