Author Archive

Kate Elizabeth Queram

Kate Elizabeth Queram is a staff correspondent for Government Executive’s Route Fifty. She most recently covered state and local government for the News & Record, a daily newspaper in Greensboro, N.C. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland.
Management

'The Mayor Can Set The Tone': How City Leaders Respond to Mass Shootings

Mayors who have seen their cities go through mass shootings discuss how to recover from—and whether it's possible to prepare for—tragedy.

Public Safety

A Plan to Expand Workers Comp Benefits to First Responders with PTSD

The Wisconsin Senate this week approved a bill that would extend benefits available to full-time law enforcement officers and firefighters, but not apply to volunteers or EMTs.

Management

Census Talk with an Arizona Mayor

Mesa Mayor John Giles is an active participant in his city's census preparation and was an outspoken critic of a proposal to add a citizenship question to the 2020 survey.

Management

A Nebraska Law Bans People with STDs from Marrying. A Lawmaker Wants to Scrap It

An obscure law in Nebraska prevents people with STDs from marrying—and makes it difficult for people to annul their marriages for similar reasons.

Health & Human Services

Preventing Discrimination Against Preventive HIV Medication

A proposal before the Maine Legislature would forbid life insurance companies from denying coverage to people who take medication to prevent HIV.

Management

A Tourism Campaign Centered on a Lack of Tourists

In its 2020 advertising campaign, North Dakota urges travelers to "follow your curiosity—not the crowds," a nod to the state's wide-open landscape and sparsely populated attractions.

Public Safety

Deploying Body-Worn Cameras in a County Jail

A sheriff's office in Wyoming recently began using body-worn cameras on deputies working inside the county jail, the first in the state to test the technology in a correctional setting.

Management

2019 Capped the Hottest Decade on Record

The past decade was the hottest in recorded history, and 2019 was the second-warmest year, according to data released Wednesday by NOAA and NASA.

Tech & Data

State Park Debuts Virtual Reality Hike

Table Rock State Park in South Carolina now provides a 5-minute virtual hike, offered for free at the park's visitor center to anyone who can't—or doesn't want to—walk the real thing.

Health & Human Services

State Lawmakers Urge Medicaid Expansion to Fight Maternal Mortality Crisis

A bipartisan panel of Georgia lawmakers recommended that the state expand Medicaid coverage for poor and rural mothers, a move they said could help lower the state's high maternal death rate.

Management

A Vermont Lawmaker Calls for Cell Phone Age Limits

A new proposal, which points out all the other things young people aren't allowed to do, would restrict cell phone usage to residents over the age of 21.

Featured eBooks

Management

Investigating Illegal Elk Poaching

Five elk were poached from mid-November to mid-December in Michigan, the most ever illegally killed in one month.

Management

A Proposal to Protect Referees From Angry Parents

A Wisconsin lawmaker, who is also a youth umpire, wants to increase penalties for harassing or intimidating sports officials, a move he hopes will improve recruitment and retention in the field of athletics.

Health & Human Services

The Disproportionate Effects of Air Pollution

Residents of poor and segregated neighborhoods around St. Louis had heightened risk of cancer due to increased exposure to air pollutants, including car emissions, researchers found.

Management

An Airport Fully Embraces 'Terminal Tourism'

Non-ticketed visitors can accompany loved ones to their gates at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, the latest to establish a pass program to allow non-passengers past security.

Management

A State Restarts Its Electric Vehicle Rebates

Massachusetts extended its rebate program through at least 2021 after legislators provided funding for the program in the most recent budget.

Finance

Big Cities Mostly Prepared to Weather Next Recession, Report Says

Chicago and Detroit are outliers, least able to withstand a recession, among the big cities examined by Moody's, which looked at how prepared cities are when a downturn comes.

Management

One of the Largest U.S. Library Systems Just Eliminated Late Fees

The Los Angeles Public Library will eliminate fees for overdue items this spring, joining a growing number of library systems that have identified fines as barriers to access for low-income residents.

Health & Human Services

South Carolina Lawmaker Wants to Mandate Media Literacy Classes

The proposal would aim to create a media literacy curriculum for public schools by the 2021-2022 school year.

Management

In This State, Government Employees Can Now Bring Their Babies to Work

Starting next month, some state employees in New Hampshire will be allowed to bring their infants to work.