Seattle, Baltimore Take on the Housing Affordability Crisis

The former has houses selling for $820,000 on average, while the latter is saddled with about 16,500 boarded up homes.

Whether Opportunity Zones Help Low Income Residents May Fall On Mayors

City leaders are faced with how to prepare for a major economic development opportunity “with very few guardrails at the federal level.”

R.I. Gov. Toughens Rules for State Lawyers After Costly Mistakes

The new policies also effect state employees who need certifications and licensures.

It’s Wildfire Season in California, and Utilities Want to Tamp Down Their Liability

Power lines coming into contact with trees causes many wildfires in California. Should utilities be held responsible or be allowed to pass on liability to ratepayers?

Keeping Students' Data Safe

David Couch, chief information officer for the Kentucky Department of Education, discusses student data privacy, the biggest threats to his state's system and cutting down on the information that school districts collect.

Federal Housing and Transportation Spending Bill Moves to Senate

Programs key to local and state government would largely see either steady funding or spending increases.

Federal Immigration Reform Could Boost Boston’s Economy

The city faces a potential labor shortage in key industries it’s typically filled with immigrants.

Coastal Flooding Likely to Continue Breaking Records

High-tide flooding happens twice as often in coastal areas as it did 30 years ago due to rising sea levels, according to a new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

We're About To Find Out How Big the 'Gig Economy' Actually Is

The federal government this week will release data on how many people are contingent workers, temporary employees and work on contract.

Fort Worth, Texas Cracks Top Cities List

Fort Worth added 18,664 people in 2017, an average of 51 per day—enough to push the city into 15th place on the list of the country’s largest, according to recent census data.

Black Drivers in Missouri Are 85% More Likely to Be Stopped Than Whites

New statistics on the inconsistent treatment of blacks and whites by police in the state show how little has changed after the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

Ruling Against Colorado, Supreme Court Sidesteps Civil and Religious Rights

Instead, Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission provided state and local governments a lecture on fair governance.

Vermont Will Pay You $10,000 to Move There and Work Remotely

A rapidly shrinking tax base has prompted some creative solutions from state officials.

Census Citizenship Fight Will Sway States' Political Clout, Federal Money

Alabama sues to keep U.S. Census from counting undocumented immigrants. Phoenix City Council, meanwhile, votes to sue to block Census Bureau from asking whether someone is a citizen.

Trump’s Trade Tariffs May Cause 146,000 Job Losses in the U.S.

Tariffs might protect some jobs in the U.S. steel industry, but far fewer than the number of jobs that will be lost. Here's where the impacts will be felt.

State and Local Governments Rely on Gig Economy to Fill Some Positions, Survey Says

“Positions filled via the gig economy may include those that have a high degree of independent contractors available … or which lend themselves to temporary services," according to the 2018 state and local government workforce survey.

Help Us Honor the Best in State and Local Government

Nominations for the third annual Route Fifty Navigator Awards are now open!

States' Rights Advocates Look to Double Down on Supreme Court Sports Betting Win

On issues ranging from sanctuary cities to telecommunications, activists are betting big on the Supreme Court’s sports gambling decision.