Courts

Exempting Breastfeeding Mothers from Jury Duty

A proposal in Washington state would allow breastfeeding mothers to skip jury duty.

Protecting the Privacy of First Responders

A proposal in New York would prohibit disclosure of the home addresses of paramedics and firefighters to defense attorneys during court proceedings.

After Deadly Crash, Lawsuit Spotlights Problem of Parking Near Intersections

When cars are parked close to intersections, they can block drivers from seeing other traffic and pedestrians. A lawsuit seeks a court order to force Portland, Oregon to address the issue.

A Plan To Prevent Drunk Drivers From Buying Alcohol

Proposed legislation in Utah would create an "Alcohol-Restricted Individual Program," with both voluntary and court-ordered participation.

Speaking Statistically, This GOP Donor Wants to Convince You that Money Buys Justice in Texas

After losing before the Texas Supreme Court against a big oil company, a wealthy Republican donor concluded that major corporations represented by certain elite law firms are more likely to succeed at the state's high court.

Federal Court Rules Against State Law Requiring Ex-Felons to Pay Fines and Fees Before Voting

The appeals court found the law created an unconstitutional penalty against people who can’t afford to pay certain financial obligations, but have served the rest of their sentences.

American Law Does Not Take Rape Seriously

COMMENTARY | Permeating every moment of Harvey Weinstein’s trial is the disturbing history of sexual-assault prosecution in America.

State Can’t Ban Ads for Discount Booze, Appeals Court Rules

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found Missouri restrictions on alcohol advertising violated the First Amendment.

Kansas City Sues Gunmaker and Others Over Alleged Firearm Trafficking

The lawsuit by the Missouri city is the first one a municipality has filed against the gun industry in over 10 years, officials say.

AGs Argue Federal Railroad Law Shouldn’t Override State Permitting Power

Six Democratic attorneys general weighed in on a legal dispute about Washington state’s denial of environmental permits for a coal export facility.

States Seek to Keep Climate Change Lawsuit Out of Federal Court

Thirteen states filed a brief this month hoping to keep a Rhode Island lawsuit against oil and gas companies in state rather than federal court.

Death Penalty Used by an Increasingly Small Number of States

Seven states executed 22 inmates this year, the second lowest number of executions since 1991.

Appeals Court Sides With Activist In Challenge Over City’s Bullhorn Restrictions

The California case concerns whether local permitting requirements for using megaphones and other sound amplification equipment infringe on free speech.

With ‘Outlier’ 2nd Amendment Case, Supreme Court Could Raise Bar for Gun Laws

The New York City case gives the court a chance to tighten the standards that lower courts use to decide whether firearms regulations are constitutional.

Amid Crackdowns on Homeless People Living Outside, Group Appeals Food Sharing Case

Food Not Bombs is appealing the latest ruling in a case that challenged restrictions on sharing food with the homeless in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Half of Americans Dealing With Civil Law Problems, Survey Finds

A quarter of respondents described two or more circumstances that had the potential to land them in court over a year's time, for issues like overdue debts, child custody disputes and evictions.

Truckers Challenge ‘Gig Worker’ Law With Lawsuit

They’re arguing that the landmark California legislation, meant to strengthen protections for workers, is preempted by federal law and shouldn’t apply to the trucking industry.

Disability Advocates Sue Cities Over Scooters Blocking Sidewalks

A new suit against Minneapolis and scooter companies is at least the third of its kind filed this year. It alleges that electric scooters are creating hazards on sidewalks for people with disabilities.

A Plan to Reduce Bench Warrants—By Text Message

After success in one county, Minnesota is rolling out a statewide program that sends reminders to defendants about their court appearances.

Union Agrees to $3.2 Million Settlement in Dispute Over Fees

The pending settlement comes in a legal dispute between home care workers and a public sector labor union in Washington state.