Data

Lack of Public Data Hampers COVID-19 Fight

Thin public health budgets and dated technology stymie reporting efforts.

A Blueprint for How State Leaders Can Achieve Better Results

COMMENTARY | Data and evidence can help state policymakers make thoughtful decisions on public health, economics, equity and other issues.

State AG Recommends Data Reporting Mandate for Police Deadly Force Incidents

As it stands, most police agencies in Washington state are not reporting this type of information through a program the FBI launched last year.

Calls Grow for Amazon to End Ring Partnerships with Police Departments

Footage captured on Ring, the video doorbell sold by Amazon, is available to over one thousand law enforcement agencies nationwide.

A State Moves to Publicly Disclose Information on Workplace Coronavirus Outbreaks

The decision by Oregon officials comes after scrutiny over outbreaks at a fruit company there.

State and Federal Data on COVID-19 Testing Don’t Match Up

The CDC has quietly started releasing nationwide numbers. But they contradict what states themselves are reporting.

One Coronavirus Model Offers More Optimistic Projections

An updated estimate from the University of Washington decreased the expected number of deaths related to Covid-19 by more than 11,000. But other models offer more devastating projections.

The Human Cost of Missing Data in Prisons

COMMENTARY | Nowhere is good information about operations more critical than in prisons and jails. But too often states simply lack the kind of data that holds officials accountable.

One Month Out, Watchdog Warns About Census IT and Cybersecurity Challenges

The Census Bureau this month switched the internet response system that respondents will use to complete the 2020 census questionnaire. The last-minute change worries the Government Accountability Office.

Too Many Drugs, Too Little Data

COMMENTARY | Unlike other states, Massachusetts leaders relied on data—crucial in developing policies, but too often not available—to guide their decision to begin allowing medication-assisted treatment for drug addiction in jails.

The Healthiest—and Unhealthiest—States

Reduced smoking rates, not much violent crime and low reports of sexually transmitted diseases make Vermont the healthiest state in the country, according to rankings released this week.

Cities and States Take Up the Battle for an Open Internet

More than 100 mayors have pledged not to sign contracts with internet service providers that violate net neutrality.

After 30 Years, the Last State Finally Automated Its Child Support System

South Carolina struggled for decades to switch from manual process run by counties to a largely automated system run by the state.

The Millennial Urban Lifestyle Is About to Get More Expensive

COMMENTARY | As WeWork crashes and Uber bleeds cash, the consumer-tech gold rush may be coming to an end.

How an Attempt at Correcting Bias in Tech Goes Wrong

Google sent contractors to Atlanta, Los Angeles, and college campuses across the country to collect biometric data that it could use to train the facial-recognition software in its Pixel phones.

The Problem With the State-Level Investigation of Google

The probe may do more for the attorneys general than for the public they’re supposed to protect.

One State's Plans to Expand Connected Vehicle Technology

More cars and trucks that can communicate with roadside sensors are expected to roll off assembly lines in the coming years.

America is Aging and Growing More Diverse, Census Data Shows

“More than four out of every five counties were older in 2018 than in 2010," said one Census Bureau official about new population estimates.

Using Data to Predict Coastal Flood Risk

A new online tool compiles NOAA water-level data and storm forecasts to help coastal residents prepare for floods.

The Best—and Worst—States to Live In

Washington ranks first in U.S. News & World Report's annual "Best States" rankings, while Louisiana took last place for the third consecutive year.