Children With Autism Left Behind by Low Medicaid Rates

Lawsuits in South Carolina and California accuse the states of failing to provide "medically necessary" services for children with autism because Medicaid reimbursement rates are so low that no providers will accept them.

Giving Group Homes a 21st Century Makeover

A new law caps the amount of time the federal government will pay to house children in group homes. New York state officials are concerned it will end up costing counties. Colorado, Rhode Island, West Virginia and Wyoming have the greatest percentage of foster children living in group homes.

Yes, You Can Become Addicted to Marijuana. And the Problem is Growing.

Public health and medical officials are grappling with a surge in demand for marijuana addiction treatment.

Will the New Foster Care Law Give Grandparents a Hand?

Some advocates for children being raised by grandparents worry that a new federal law will make it more difficult for caregivers to get help from state agencies and financial assistance.

There Might Be a Cheaper Drug, But Pharmacists Can’t Tell You That

State legislatures consider proposals to eliminate the so-called gag rules that pharmacists say can prevent them from telling customers about cheaper drugs.

What Virginia's Vote Means for the Future of Medicaid Expansion

With state legislators deciding this week to extend the program to 400,000 citizens, the drawn-out battle over Obamacare’s signature provision draws nearer to an end.

Trump Wants Medicaid to Push for Lower Drug Prices—But Will Patients Be Hurt?

Five states will be able to experiment with negotiating directly with drugmakers to lower prices. They can also close their formularies, so they don't need to cover all prescription drugs.

Why States Worry That 'Association Health Plans' Will Be Magnets for Scam Artists

Some insurance regulators agitate for power to regulate plans to ensure consumers are protected.

1 in 5 Americans Know Someone Who Has Been Addicted to Opioids

A Federal Reserve study looked at how people assessed the state of their local economy and the national economy, to see if the “deaths of despair” hypothesis of the opioid abuse crisis held true.

Millions of SNAP Recipients Would Fall Short of Proposed Work Requirements

If the changes went into effect today, 5.2 million people would fail to meet the new requirements in a given month, according to analysis from the Urban Institute.

Egg-Caused Salmonella Outbreak Leads to the Largest U.S. Recall Since 2010

The Food and Drug Administration has traced the outbreak to a farm in Hyde County, North Carolina.

Dozens More Counties Join Opioid Lawsuits

The new lawsuits aim to “recover millions of dollars lost due to opiate addiction and drug overdoses that have taken so many lives in this country and greatly affected the lives of many.”

America's Opioid Crisis Is Now a Fentanyl Crisis

Officials know that synthetic opioids are killing more people than heroin or OxyContin—but there’s still a lot of data missing.

Multiple Cities Face Legal Challenges Over Anti-Panhandling Laws

“... [W]henever a new city does consider passing a new panhandling law where they didn’t have one before, they’re immediately either sued or they get a lot of pushback,” according to Cleveland State University law professor Joseph Mead.

New Lawsuit Aims to Pressure Maine Governor to Act on Medicaid

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Arizona teacher walkouts to continue … Gary to cancel its air show for second time … Nashville transit vote … and companies scoop up their scooters in Austin.

Experts Question Feasibility of SNAP Work Requirements Plan

“If we want to do this, let’s do it well,” according to Pete Weber of the Fresno Bridge Academy. “What’s being proposed needs some adjustments.”

29 Local Governments Selected for Childhood Development Partnership

Communities selected for StriveTogether have demonstrated a commitment to ensuring kids have a strong start in life.

Kentucky Official Says State Is Safe to Visit Amid Outbreak

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Asian tick’s New Jersey foothold … Ohio cities find compromise on telecom bill … North Dakota governor covers costs of his official travel … and Kauai recovers.

A Legal Quirk Means You Can Be Dead in New York But Alive in New Jersey

All 50 states recognize that someone is legally dead once they are brain dead, but the Garden State has a rather large exemption.