Author Archive

Dave Nyczepir

Dave Nyczepir
Dave Nyczepir is a News Editor for Government Executive's Route Fifty. He previously was a reporter at the Desert Sun newspaper in Southern California's Coachella Valley and worked for Campaigns & Elections magazine and covered Maryland's 2012 legislative session for the University of Maryland's Capital News Service and holds a master's of journalism from the University of Maryland.
Management

Maine’s Offshore Wind Promise Goes Unfulfilled, Advocates Say

Proponents of the renewable energy hope the state’s next governor embraces new technology local universities are developing to advance the industry.

Management

Cities Form New Racial Equity Network With Private Sector

The commitment has its origins in a 2016 research initiative addressing structural racism in five jurisdictions.

Management

Local Advocates Decry Proposed State ‘Bribe’ to Permit Drilling

House Republicans are pushing a plan that would financially incentivize states to drill for oil and gas and punish those that don’t.

Tech & Data

Determining Once and for All How the ‘Gig Economy’ Impacts Transit

Cities like Sacramento are helping pilot a new measure of interaction between travel modes.

Health & Human Services

In No State Can Minimum-Wage Workers Afford a Two-Bedroom Rental

“This will be a problem for the foreseeable future,” said Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, which released a new study Wednesday.

Management

How Cities Can Respond When the State Legislature Says ‘No’

From defiance to exploiting legal loopholes, municipalities are trying everything to get around state preemption laws and maintain local authority.

Management

Seattle, Baltimore Take on the Housing Affordability Crisis

The former has houses selling for $820,000 on average, while the latter is saddled with about 16,500 boarded up homes.

Tech & Data

Facebook Will Offer Platforms Teaching Tech Skills in Cities

“When people get the opportunity to get the training they need, they can get great jobs,” said COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Management

Federal Immigration Reform Could Boost Boston’s Economy

The city faces a potential labor shortage in key industries it’s typically filled with immigrants.

Tech & Data

Monitoring Fire Truck Health in Real Time

For fire departments, nothing is more problematic than an out-of-service rig.

Smart Cities

City Leaders Envision Future With Driverless Cars

Autonomous vehicles promise increased equity and efficiency, but a new report says governments need to make sure the right policies are regulating them.

Infrastructure

5G Aesthetics Prove a Balancing Act for Cities Like Palo Alto

Small cell deployments by wireless infrastructure providers are often less of a partnership with municipalities than they appear.

Infrastructure

Flood Resilience Challenge Yields the South Bay ‘Sponge’

“One thing that was really evident: Even people who are following closely are not totally aware of the flood risks that we have in the [San Francisco] Bay Area.”

Tech & Data

Council of State Governments Extends Overseas Voting Initiative

The partnership will evaluate electronic ballot systems among other technologies and policies.

Tech & Data

A New Open-Source Framework for Government Projects

Louisville, Kentucky is making the infrastructure for analyzing historic Waze data available to anyone who partners on the process.

Finance

How Exposed Is Your State to Trade Tensions?

More than a dozen states have above-average international trade exposure, per a new Moody’s report.

Finance

Atlanta Gets Creative Financing Green Infrastructure

The city plans to undertake eight projects worth $12.9 million making its Westside more resilient to flooding.

Management

Report: 68 National Parks Threatened by Offshore Drilling Expansion

Companies simply can’t guarantee a catastrophic spill won’t occur jeopardizing the livelihoods of coastal communities, a new report says.

Tech & Data

Closing the ‘Digital Divide’ Means Sizing It up First

Broadband accessibility advocates worry a bill working its way through the Senate might “water down” the FCC’s minimum speed standard.