Author Archive

Sophie Quinton

Finance

The Little Town That Pot Built

Garden City, Colorado, has fewer than 300 residents, but has spent $3 million on downtown infrastructure upgrades since retail marijuana was legalized.

Management

Thinning Forests Helps Reduce Wildfires, But There Isn't Always a Market

The Trump administration, states and local leaders—including many environmentalists—agree that more must be done to avert catastrophic wildfire, including thinning trees.

Public Safety

‘Marsy’s Law’ Protections for Crime Victims Sound Great, but Could Cause Problems

Six states have approved the victims' rights constitutional amendments, with voters in six more soon expected to consider similar measures.

Public Safety

Hemp, on the Brink of Being Legal, Still Faces Challenges

Nineteen of the states that allow hemp cultivation reported a crop last year.

Management

Towns Pick Up the Tab for U.S. Forest Service Staff

Some town governments in Colorado's mountains are setting aside money to pay for U.S. Forest Service employees, hoping the extra staff can better maintain national forests that are crowded with tourists each summer.

Finance

As Students Head to Campus, Colleges Fear International Student Decline

Regional colleges and universities may be harder hit financially by an enrollment decline, because they don’t have other sources of revenue—such as multibillion-dollar endowments—to cushion the blow.

Management

Feds Say Marketplace Will Expose Bad Colleges, But States Find It’s Not So Easy

Many states have come up with tools to help college students find out information about future earnings and debt, but they often rely on partial data that can limit their usefulness.

Management

Instead of Razing Buildings, Some Cities Want to Reuse Their Bones

Cities across the country are looking at whether blighted buildings can be "deconstructed" instead of demolished, and whether this can help to create local jobs.

Management

Lawmakers in Blue States Try to Protect Organized Labor

Even before the Supreme Court ruled against public sector unions in June, eight of the 22 states that allowed unions to charge non-member fees took steps to cushion the blow.

Public Safety

Marijuana Bills Increasingly Focus on Social Justice

When advocates now seek marijuana legalization, they also are focusing on investment in poor communities and fixing longstanding criminal justice problems.

Infrastructure

Why 'Orphan' Oil and Gas Wells Are a Growing Problem for States

Nobody knows how many orphan and abandoned drilling sites exist, but the federal government estimates there could be more than a million.

Management

Commercial Spaceports Still Waiting for Liftoff

Can spaceports be the next economic development engine? Camden County in Georgia is betting on the industry.

Management

It’s Wildfire Season in California, and Utilities Want to Tamp Down Their Liability

Power lines coming into contact with trees causes many wildfires in California. Should utilities be held responsible or be allowed to pass on liability to ratepayers?

Finance

Why More School Districts Are Holding Class Just Four Days a Week

Today school districts in parts of 22 states use a four-day week, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Management

Pizza, Pad Thai and Pot: Home Delivery of Marijuana Is Legal in These States

Lawmakers states that pioneered recreational marijuana legalization have been reluctant to allow home delivery, even in an era when consumers are used to getting more items delivered.

Public Safety

To Prevent Suicides and School Shootings, More States Embrace Anonymous Tip Lines

States across the country are responding to high-profile school shootings and rising teen suicide rates by creating tip lines modeled on Colorado’s.

Management

As Trump Moves to Erect Trade Barriers, ‘Foreign Trade Zones’ Aim to Take Them Down

There’s little research on whether foreign trade zones help or hurt the economy, or encourage companies to employ more workers than they otherwise would.

Tech & Data

Why ‘Cloud Seeding’ Is Increasingly Attractive to the Thirsty West

A National Science Foundation-funded study, conducted in Idaho, was the first to show real-world observations of silver iodide forming ice crystals inside clouds and falling out as precipitation.